Applied Rheology: Publications

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Delegates of the national rheological societies
Society's Site Mar 2018 - Aug 2018

Appl. Rheol. 28:1 (2018) 50-54

Cite this publication as follows:
Rheological Societies: Society's Site Mar 2018 - Aug 2018, Appl. Rheol. 28 (2018) 50.

Fausto Calderas, Luis Medina-Torres, Octavio Manero
33rd International Conference of The Polymer Processing Society (PPS-33)

Appl. Rheol. 28:1 (2018) 47-49

Cite this publication as follows:
Calderas F, Medina-Torres L, Manero O: 33rd International Conference of The Polymer Processing Society (PPS-33), Appl. Rheol. 28 (2018) 47.

S. M. Sohel Murshed, Carlos Nieto de Castro, Jose Enrique Julia
First European Symposium on Nanofluids (ESNf2017)

Appl. Rheol. 28:1 (2018) 45-47

Cite this publication as follows:
SohelMurshed SM, NietodeCastro C, EnriqueJulia J: First European Symposium on Nanofluids (ESNf2017), Appl. Rheol. 28 (2018) 45.

Ren Jie Chin, Sai Hin Lai, Shaliza Ibrahim, Wan Zurina Wan Jaafar
Factors affect wall slip: particle size, concentration and temperature

Appl. Rheol. 28:1 (2018) 15775 (9 pages)

Concentrated suspensions are very complex in nature and exhibit non-Newtonian flow properties although the suspending fluid might behave as a Newtonian fluid. Among the interesting properties, wall slip will be the main focus of this study. The formation of wall slip layer adjacent to the solid boundary may lead to inaccurate measurement of rheological properties. So, the measured viscosity can be lower than the actual viscosity and thus a basic understanding on wall slip is critical. Concentration, particle size, and temperature are the factors affecting the wall slip mechanism. Therefore, this research study tends to study the relationship between the parameters (concentration, particle size, and temperature) and wall slip. The result shows that the slip velocity increases with shear stress under the conditions where (i) concentration decreases, (ii) particle size increases, and (iii) temperature increases. Two regression models considering the three parameters are proposed and can be used respectively as an alternative to predict slip velocity and true shear rate.

Cite this publication as follows:
Chin RJ, Lai SH, Ibrahim S, WanJaafar WZ: Factors affect wall slip: particle size, concentration and temperature, Appl. Rheol. 28 (2018) 15775.

Irina Masalova, Willy Mbasha, Rainer Haldenwang, Alexander Ya. Malkin
Rheokinetics of cement paste hydration during the dormant phase

Appl. Rheol. 28:1 (2018) 15452 (9 pages)

The hydration kinetics of four CEM I 52.5 N cements in the presence of two different superplasticizers was studied. The kinetics was characterized by monitoring the evolution of the dynamic modulus at constant frequency on a rotational rheometer. The method consists of predicting the time dependence of the elastic modulus by a kinetic equation of the self-acceleration type and fitting the equation to the experimental data. The model defines two main characteristic constants i.e. the characteristic time which defines the initial rate of hydration and the self-acceleration coefficient. It is shown that the model can accurately predict the initial hydration of cement paste with and without superplasticizer. The effect of the different cement properties and their interaction with superplasticizers can be observed in the kinetics of hydration.

Cite this publication as follows:
Masalova I, Mbasha W, Haldenwang R, Malkin AY: Rheokinetics of cement paste hydration during the dormant phase, Appl. Rheol. 28 (2018) 15452.

Mohammad Reza Garmsiri, Hassan Haji Amin Shirazi
The effect of suspension properties on shear yield stress and compressibility of the suspension of copper flotation tailings

Appl. Rheol. 28:1 (2018) 15721 (8 pages)

The performance of modern slurry dewatering equipment is essentially dependent on the efficiency of compression. Shear yield stress as an index of flowability and compressibility is affected by suspension properties, while the presence of reagents may be significant. In this work, the effect of fine fraction, pH, flocculant, and collector concentration on the shear yield stress of copper flotation tailings at concentrators placed at Sarcheshmeh and Shahrebabak (Iran) were examined. Slump and settling tests were utilized to investigate the shear yield stress and compressibility of suspension. A pilot scale column was also employed to investigate the compressibility of suspension. Results indicated that shear yield stress increase, while compressibility decrease with flocculant concentration and fine fraction. It was found that the shear yield stress steadily increased with pH. Furthermore, in the presence of collectors the shear yield stress was reduced, while the compressibility enhanced.

Cite this publication as follows:
Garmsiri MR, HajiAminShirazi H: The effect of suspension properties on shear yield stress and compressibility of the suspension of copper flotation tailings, Appl. Rheol. 28 (2018) 15721.

Carlos Eduardo Carbone, Roberto Cesar de Oliveira Romano, Maria Alba Cincotto, Rafael Giuliano Pileggi
Hardening stage evaluation of white Portland cements using oscillatory and compressive rheometry, isothermal calorimetry and the Vicat test

Appl. Rheol. 28:1 (2018) 16396 (9 pages)

White Portland cement can be used such as decorative coatings, masonry regularization as the skin coat, and many other applications mainly due to the ease of association with pigments to confer coloring to the applied products for aesthetic purposes. Despite of the evaluation of the hardened stage properties to be more commonly found in literature, just a few published works monitored the transition from fluid-to-solid stage, but this is an important step because it defines the performance of products over time. The main purpose of this work was to compare the consolidation of different types of white Portland cement during the hardening stage, i.e. using a combined evaluation of the chemical and physical phenomena. Isothermal conduction calorimetry was the method used to monitor the heat release during the hydration reaction and oscillatory and compressive rheometry were applied to monitor the changes in workability over time. The setting time, measured by Vicat test represents the open time of each composition and was evaluated because it is affected by the physicochemical changes of the cement. Despite the obtained results are standardized, they are empirical/arbitrary by nature. Three brands of white Portland cements (CauĂȘAalborg, and Tolteca) were chosen and their suspensions were prepared to achieve a constant watercement ratio of 0.5. All suspensions presented shear thinning behavior, but different levels of yield stress and apparent viscosity. The Tolteca cement presented the fastest heat release, which impacted the gain on consistency as measured by oscillatory rheometry or the loss of workability as measured by the squeeze flow test. The combined evaluations, i.e. physical and chemical results indicated that despite the fact that the changes during the hardening process had been affected: Correlations were only observed in the physical parameters indicating that the hydration reaction promotes random changes in the microstructure development.

Cite this publication as follows:
Carbone CE, Romano RCdO, Cincotto MA, Pileggi RG: Hardening stage evaluation of white Portland cements using oscillatory and compressive rheometry, isothermal calorimetry and the Vicat test, Appl. Rheol. 28 (2018) 16396.


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