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Georgios Georgiou, Andreas Alexandrou
8th International Meeting of the Hellenic Society of Rheology (HSR 2017)

Appl. Rheol. 27:4 (2017) 54-54

Cite this publication as follows:
Georgiou G, Alexandrou A: 8th International Meeting of the Hellenic Society of Rheology (HSR 2017), Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 54.

Corneliu Balan
The 3rd Romainan Society of Rheology - Summer School of Rheology

Appl. Rheol. 27:4 (2017) 47-49

Cite this publication as follows:
Balan C: The 3rd Romainan Society of Rheology - Summer School of Rheology, Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 47.

Myoungsung Choi, Robert K. Prudhomme, George W. Scherer
Rheological evaluation of compatibility in oil well cementing

Appl. Rheol. 27:4 (2017) 43354 (9 pages)

In primary cementing of an oil well, the oil-based drilling mud (lubricant) is displaced by sequential pumping of an aqueous surfactant 'spacer' fluid, and then the aqueous cement slurry. The cement sets to seal the annular space between the geological formation and the steel wellbore casing. In the displacement process, there will be some intermixing of the fluids. Compatibility between the drilling mud, the spacer, and the cement slurry is necessary to achieve successful zonal isolation. In this study, steady shear and dynamic oscillatory shear were used to investigate the changes in rheology that occur as a result of this inter-mixing. For the steady shear measurements the Herschel-Bulkley model shows good agreement with measured stress-strain data, accurately capturing the yield stress and the plastic viscosity over the range of shear rates from 0.75 to 520 s-1. The vis-coelastic properties, which are related to the microstructure of the slurry were examined by using dynamic oscillatory shear and it was demonstrated that this measurement could be utilized to evaluate the compatibility. Moreover, a close relationship between yield stress and storage modulus was observed, which enabled a correlation relating the steady shear and the dynamic oscillatory results.

Cite this publication as follows:
Choi M, Prudhomme RK, Scherer GW: Rheological evaluation of compatibility in oil well cementing, Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 43354.

Delegates of the national rheological societies
Society's Site Sep 2017 - Feb 2018

Appl. Rheol. 27:4 (2017) 46-56

Cite this publication as follows:
Rheological Societies: Society's Site Sep 2017 - Feb 2018, Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 46.

Balaji V. S. Iyer, Harish Dixit
Complex Fluids Meeting (CompFlu@Hyd 2016)

Appl. Rheol. 27:4 (2017) 45-45

Cite this publication as follows:
Iyer BVS, Dixit H: Complex Fluids Meeting (CompFlu@Hyd 2016), Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 45.

F.M. Leon-Martinez, P. F. de J. Cano-Barrita
Yield stress of mortars in rotational and oscillatory shear experiments usinag a ball measuring system

Appl. Rheol. 27:4 (2017) 45838 (11 pages)

This study compared the flow curve fitting and oscillatory strain sweep methods to determine the yield stresses of Portland cement mortars using a ball measuring system (BMS). The tests were performed in two stages. In the first stage, the responses from a BMS with ball diameters of 8, 12, and 15 mm were compared to those from conventional cone-plate geometry with two different polymer dispersions. In the second stage, thirty-five mortars were prepared with 10 wt% of the cement replaced by silica fume. Five water-to-binder ratios and seven concentrations of a polycarboxylate-based superplasticizer were selected. An 8-mm diameter ball was selected for use in mortar production due to the smaller drag that it produced. The results indicated an increase in the linear viscoelastic region due to a reduction in the water-to-binder ratio and/or an increase in the superplasticizer concentration. In oscillatory tests, the dynamic yield stress was related to the stability of the cement paste and the strengths of the internal links between the cement particles. The flow and Herschel-Bulkley yield stresses result were not statistically different. Therefore, flow stress calculations could be carried out using either of these methods. An amplitude sweep test performed using the BMS may be an alternative method of studying the rheology of cement-based materials.

Cite this publication as follows:
Leon-Martinez FM, Cano-Barrita PFdJ: Yield stress of mortars in rotational and oscillatory shear experiments usinag a ball measuring system, Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 45838.

Ganesh Dombe, N.K. Yadav, R.M. Lagade, M. Mehilal, Chetan Bhongale
Studies on Measurement of Yield Stress of Propellant Suspensions using Falling Ball and Slump Test

Appl. Rheol. 27:4 (2017) 45262 (7 pages)

Visco-plasticity characterized by yield stress is an important rheological property of composite propellant suspensions. The yield stress along with viscosity affects various unit operations in propellant processing as well as the quality of final product. The characterization of yield stress of propellant suspensions using direct measurement techniques, such as forced falling ball and slump test is described. The slump test is a simple and quick measurement tool with applicability at processing site whereas forced ball drop is useful for measurement of very high yield stress. The yield stress measurement of propellant suspension of four different compositions with varying particle size and volume fraction using above methods is reported and results are compared with vane geometry of rotational rheometer. Further, the yield stress behavior was studied for the propellant compositions with increasing solid loading. The dependence of yield stress of the studied propellant compositions on the reduced packing fraction φ/φm of solids is established and expressed by a mathematical correlation. In addition, effect of vibration on yield stress was also studied using slump test.

Cite this publication as follows:
Dombe G, Yadav N, Lagade R, Mehilal M, Bhongale C: Studies on Measurement of Yield Stress of Propellant Suspensions using Falling Ball and Slump Test, Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 45262.

Eakasit Sritham, Sundaram Gunasekaran
Rheological and Microstructure Evaluations of Amorphous Sucrose-Maltodextrin-Sodium Citrate Mixture

Appl. Rheol. 27:4 (2017) 43102 (10 pages)

Rheological properties and the mechanical relaxation behavior of rubbery amorphous sucrose-maltodextrin-sodium citrate systems were studied at room temperature using the small amplitude oscillatory shear test in the frequency range of 0.1 - 150 Hz. The system with high sucrose concentration exhibited viscous-dominant relaxation, while the system with high maltodextrin concentration exhibited elastic-dominant relaxation. The addition of sodium citrate could retard molecular mobility presumably due to its molecular interaction with sucrose rather than with maltodextrin. The technique was capable to detect changes in molecular process even with a small variation in the matrix components. Evidences obtained with scanning electron micrographs suggested the possible effect of sodium citrate to interfere with molecular interactions in the system with high maltodextrin concentration, i.e. the system tended to be more brittle.

Cite this publication as follows:
Sritham E, Gunasekaran S: Rheological and Microstructure Evaluations of Amorphous Sucrose-Maltodextrin-Sodium Citrate Mixture, Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 43102.


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