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Pablo G. T. Lepe, Nick Tucker, Andrew J. A. Watson, Deborah LeCorre-Bordes, Antony J. Fairbanks, Mark P. Staiger
The electrospinnability of visco-elastic sugar solutions

Appl. Rheol. 27:3 (2017) 35703 (10 pages)

It has been proposed that hydrogen bonding plays a role in promoting the electrospinnability of some materials. In this work, the significance of non-covalent interactions in the electrospinnability of aqueous sugar solutions (i.e. mono- and disaccharide) was investigated as a function of carbohydrate concentration. The electrospinnability of concentrated aqueous solutions of glucose, fructose, and sucrose was studied by physicochemical and rheological characterization methods, and by subsequently examining the resulting morphology via scanning electron microscopy. The results on the electrospinning of concentrated saccharide solutions indicated the significance of non-covalent interactions on the electrospinning of these systems. Electrospinnability models based on critical concentration and visco-elasto capillary theories were compared with the experimental results. It is shown that visco-elasto capillary theory has the closest correlation with the experimental data. The electrospinnability of highly concentrated saccharide solutions appears to be directly related to the density and intermolecular bonding capacity of the solution.

Cite this publication as follows:
Lepe PGT, Tucker N, Watson AJA, LeCorre-Bordes D, Fairbanks AJ, Staiger MP: The electrospinnability of visco-elastic sugar solutions, Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 35703.

Markus Greim, Wolfgang Kusterle
26th Conference and Workshop on Rheology of Building Materials

Appl. Rheol. 27:2 (2017) 50-52

Cite this publication as follows:
Greim M, Kusterle W: 26th Conference and Workshop on Rheology of Building Materials, Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 50.

David Cheneler
Technology of Dispersed Systems and Materials: Physicochemical Dynamics of Structure Formation and Rheology (Uriev)

Appl. Rheol. 27:2 (2017) 10-10

Cite this publication as follows:
Cheneler D: Technology of Dispersed Systems and Materials: Physicochemical Dynamics of Structure Formation and Rheology (Uriev), Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 10.

David Cheneler
Biomedical Applications of Polymeric Materials and Composites (Francis and Kumar)

Appl. Rheol. 27:2 (2017) 9-10

Cite this publication as follows:
Cheneler D: Biomedical Applications of Polymeric Materials and Composites (Francis and Kumar), Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 9.

Joseph Assaad
Rheology and stability of lightweight polymer-modified self-consolidating concrete

Appl. Rheol. 27:2 (2017) 25807 (11 pages)

Limited information exists in literature regarding the effect of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) latexes on rheology and stability of lightweight self-consolidating concrete (LWSCC) intended for repair and precast works. Four series of LWSCC mixtures prepared with various lightweight aggregate (LWA) and SBR concentrations were considered in this project: The free water was adjusted to secure compressive strength of 40 ± 3.5 MPa. The slump flow remained fixed at 700 ± 25 mm, while unit weight varied from 1790 to 2280 kg/m3. Test results have shown that SBR additions lead to reduced concrete flow rate and passing ability. However, improved static stability such as bleeding, segregation, and floating of LWA. The rheological properties including yield stress and plastic viscosity increased for higher SBR additions, reflecting increased cohesiveness resulting from coalescence of water-soluble latexes and binding of cementitious matrix. Three categories of LWSCC classes specified in the European Guidelines were proposed with respect to rheological properties. A Ψ-factor was developed along with series of regression models to predict the combined effect of free water, viscosity-modifier, LWA, and SBR on rheology and stability of polymermodified LWSCC.

Cite this publication as follows:
Assaad J: Rheology and stability of lightweight polymer-modified self-consolidating concrete , Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 25807.

J. A. Carmona, N. Calero, P. Ramirez, J. Munoz
Rheology and structural recovery kinetics of an advanced performance xanthan gum with industrial application

Appl. Rheol. 27:2 (2017) 25555 (9 pages)

The overall objective of this work was to explore the rheology of an advanced performance xanthan gum, which is able to endure the shear and turbulent flows typically found in high-shear mixers or even homogenizers. A further goal was the development of a rheological experimental setup that can be used to gain information about the structural recovery after applying a given shear stress. A fast structural recovery after cessation of shear is essential for a wide range of practical applications. The high zero shear viscosity, strong shear thinning response along with a fast drop of viscosity with shear time and structural recovery support the applications of this xanthan gum as thickening agent and stabilizer. The rheological characterization focused on the influence of xanthan gum concentration (0.15 – 0.40%(m/m)) on the dynamic viscoelastic properties, steady shear and thixotropic behavior, and kinetics of structural recovery.

Cite this publication as follows:
Carmona JA, Calero N, Ramirez P, Munoz J: Rheology and structural recovery kinetics of an advanced performance xanthan gum with industrial application, Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 25555.

Evgeni Ivanov, Hristiana Velichkova, Rumiana Kotsilkova, Silvia Bistarelli, Antonino Cataldo, Federico Micciulla, Stefano Bellucci
Rheological behavior of graphene/epoxy nanodispersions

Appl. Rheol. 27:2 (2017) 24469 (9 pages)

Graphene/polymer nanocomposites are the latest trends in materials science in the recent years, but the technology of their preparation plays a crucial role in obtaining reliable materials with repeatable and enhanced properties. Up to now, there are many unresolved problems in controlling the dispersion of the graphene filler and the corresponding influence on the properties of the final nanocomposite materials. In the present study, we apply rheological methods for controlling the quality of the graphene dispersion. We prepare and characterize epoxy/graphene nanodispersions with graphene contents varying from 0.05 to 1 wt% and explore the effect of different mixing regimes on the dynamic moduli and viscosity, thus assessing the degree of the dispersion. The rheological percolation threshold and relaxation time spectra are determined, in order to evaluate the internal structure of the nanodispersions. The relaxation spectrum is highly efficient to probe the effects of interfaces and interconnections on the relaxation dynamics of molecules in nanodispersions. Rheological results combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations confirm that the low frequency dynamic viscosity and moduli strongly increase, with increasing the degree of dispersion due to the exfoliation of graphene sheets. The rheological percolation threshold was found at very low concentration depending from the processing conditions. The weight of the relaxation spectra is strongly shifted to higher values, compared to the neat epoxy resin and this effect is much stronger around and above the rheological percolation threshold.

Cite this publication as follows:
Ivanov E, Velichkova H, Kotsilkova R, Bistarelli S, Cataldo A, Micciulla F, Bellucci S: Rheological behavior of graphene/epoxy nanodispersions, Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 24469.

Dong Zhang, Shuo Liu, Jing-Yu Xu
Rheological properties of heavy crude oil containing sand from Bo-hai oilfield in China

Appl. Rheol. 27:2 (2017) 24849 (9 pages)

This paper presents an experimental study on the rheological properties of heavy crude oil containing sand to determine the effects of sand size distribution and mass concentration on apparent viscosity, thixotropic behavior, yield stress and viscoelastic properties. The results of these analyses demonstrate that heavy crude oil containing sand shows strong shear-thinning behavior and a certain degree of thixotropic properties. After blending heavy crude oil with sand, the apparent viscosity and the area of the thixotropic loop first decrease and then steadily increase with increasing sand mass concentration. At a fixed mass concentration, apparent viscosity appears to increase with increasing particle size, while yield stress decreases. Moreover, adding sand generally enhances the elastic modulus of heavy crude oil, while the complex viscosity remains slightly less than the apparent viscosity. These results provide new information helpful for removing sand from heavy crude oil.

Cite this publication as follows:
Zhang D, Liu S, Xu j: Rheological properties of heavy crude oil containing sand from Bo-hai oilfield in China, Appl. Rheol. 27 (2017) 24849.


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