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Patrick Ilg
Soft Matter Physics (Masao Doi)

Appl. Rheol. 24:2 (2014) 10-10

Cite this publication as follows:
Ilg P: Soft Matter Physics (Masao Doi), Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 10.

Hamza Soualhi, El-Hadj Kadri, Tien-Tung Ngo, Adrien Bouvet, Francois Cussigh, Said Kenai
A new vane rheometer for fresh mortar: development and validation

Appl. Rheol. 24:2 (2014) 22594 (7 pages)

This paper presents the development of a vane rheometer to estimate mortar plastic viscosity and yield stress. The rheological parameters were developed from measurements using a procedure to convert the vane torque and rotational velocity data into shear stress versus shear rate relationships. The used procedure considered the locally sheared material as a Bingham fluid and computed the characteristic shear rate from Couette analogy. The apparatus was tested with three experimental programs in which many rheological parameters of mortar compositions were calculated. The obtained results validated the rheometer test procedure and confirmed that the test results are reproducible.

Cite this publication as follows:
Soualhi H, Kadri E, Ngo T, Bouvet A, Cussigh F, Kenai S: A new vane rheometer for fresh mortar: development and validation , Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 22594.

Magdalena Orczykowska, Marek Dziubinski
Comparison of viscoelastic properties of chestnut and acorn starch by means of mechanical models with an in-built springpot

Appl. Rheol. 24:2 (2014) 24766 (7 pages)

The effect of concentration on viscoelastic properties of chestnut and acorn starch is discussed in the paper. The starch structure was assessed using a rheological fractional standard linear solid model FSLSM in contrary to very simple power-law model usually used in many published papers concerning determination of rheological properties of starch. Rheological parameters of this model were determined and their changes for different concentrations of the two tested types of starch were discussed. The values of the rheological parameter of FSLSM model give a useful of information concerning the elastic properties of materials such as total elasticity of networks, network oscillations, gel stiffness, structure of cross-linking and relaxation time of the materials. The proposed method for the interpretation of rheological measurements of the two types of starch allows for a comprehensive estimation of the analyzed biomaterial structure. The fractional rheological models can be very useful to control the biomaterial structure the needs of the final to meet envisaged product which is particularly significant from the point of view of materials engineering.

Cite this publication as follows:
Orczykowska M, Dziubinski M: Comparison of viscoelastic properties of chestnut and acorn starch by means of mechanical models with an in-built springpot, Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 24766.

Dominique Dupuis, Karim Bekkour, Kaouther Ben Azouz
On the modeling of the rheological behaviour of bentonite dispersions in polymer solutions

Appl. Rheol. 24:2 (2014) 24283 (9 pages)

Bentonite dispersions in polymer solutions may behave as gel like materials. Under stress, the structure formed at rest is progressively destroyed and a solid-liquid transition occurs. The rheological characterization of such kind of systems is often done by applying stress ramps of the sample. A simple Herschel-Bulkley equation is not convenient to fit the answer of the material to the ramp since it does not take in account the effect of time. The models for yield stress fluids involving two viscosity levels are not convenient too since they don.t take in account the elastic behavior at low stresses. We propose in this paper two equations in order to determine some parameters characterizing the rheological behavior of such systems. The results obtained both in oscillatory and permanent shear are compared according to Winter.s representation and a rescaling of the complex modulus is proposed to superimposed the data in the solid/liquid transition region.

Cite this publication as follows:
Dupuis D, Bekkour K, BenAzouz K: On the modeling of the rheological behaviour of bentonite dispersions in polymer solutions, Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 24283.

T. A. Cheema, G. M. Kim, C. Y. Lee, J. G. Hong, M. K. Kwak, C. W. Park
Characteristics of blood vessel wall deformation with porous wall conditions in an aortic arch

Appl. Rheol. 24:2 (2014) 24590 (8 pages)

Blood vessels have been modeled as non-porous structures that are permeable to solutes mixed in the blood. However, the use of non-physiological boundary conditions in numerical simulations that assume atmospheric pressure at the outlet does not illustrate the actual structural physics involved. The presence of pores in the wall influences wall deformation characteristics, which may increase the risk of rupture in specific conditions. In addition, the formation of secondary flows in a curved blood vessel may add complications to the structural behavior of the vessel walls. These reservations can be addressed by a fluid structure interaction-based numerical simulation of a three-dimensional aortic arch with increased physiological velocity and pressure waveforms. The curvature radius of the arch was 30 mm with a uniform aorta diameter of 25 mm. A one-way coupling method was used between physics of porous media flow and structural mechanics. A comparison of results with a non-porous model revealed that the approximated porous model was more prone to hypertension and rupture. Similarly, the secondary flows found to be an important indicator for the vascular compliance that forced the outer aortic region to experience the largest deformation. Consequently, it is very important to use actual physiological situations of the blood vessels to reach a diagnostic solution.

Cite this publication as follows:
Cheema TA, Kim GM, Lee CY, Hong JG, Kwak MK, Park CW: Characteristics of blood vessel wall deformation with porous wall conditions in an aortic arch, Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 24590.


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