Applied Rheology: Publications

Appl Rheol online available publications for selected issue

Follow the blue link(s) below for abstracts and full text pdfs .

Niklas Loren, Anette Larsson, Lilia Ahrne, Anne-Marie Hermansson, Peter Lillford
Water in Soft Materials - ISOPOW XII conference (2013)

Appl. Rheol. 24:1 (2014) 44-46

Cite this publication as follows:
Loren N, Larsson A, Ahrne L, Hermansson A, Lillford P: Water in Soft Materials - ISOPOW XII conference (2013), Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 44.

Delegates of the national rheological societies
Society's Site Mar 2014 - Aug 2014

Appl. Rheol. 24:1 (2014) 50-54

Cite this publication as follows:
Rheological Societies: Society's Site Mar 2014 - Aug 2014, Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 50.

Monika Dobrzynska Mizera, Tomasz Sterzynski
Congress on Rheology Poznan 2013

Appl. Rheol. 24:1 (2014) 48-49

Cite this publication as follows:
DobrzynskaMizera M, Sterzynski T: Congress on Rheology Poznan 2013, Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 48.

Nicolas Roussel, Hela Bessaies-Bey, Philippe Coussot
The 1st International RILEM Symposium on Rheology and Processing of Construction Materials

Appl. Rheol. 24:1 (2014) 46-47

Cite this publication as follows:
Roussel N, Bessaies-Bey H, Coussot P: The 1st International RILEM Symposium on Rheology and Processing of Construction Materials, Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 46.

Martin Boisly, Markus Kästner, Jörg Brummund, Volker Ulbricht
General aspects of yield stress fluids - Terminology and definition of viscosity

Appl. Rheol. 24:1 (2014) 14578 (11 pages)


This work contributes to general theoretical aspects of yield stress fluids with significance for practical phenomenological material modeling. It introduces a terminology so that the material class .yield stress fluid. is defined and can be distinguished from the terms .solid. and .liquid.. This new material classification is based on two criteria, the equilibrium relation and the flow function. In line with this terminology, an experimental procedure for classifying the material behavior is presented. The second key aspect of this paper is a discussion on the proper definition of the term .viscosity.. The benefit of the differential viscosity over the dynamic viscosity in case of non-Newtonian fluids in general is worked out. This is shown by the most elementary yield stress fluid, the friction element, because it is the basis of the yield stress concept. Its constitutive equations are given for positive as well as negative strain rates and are also able to represent the preyield behavior. The theory presented in this article is also applied to the Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt, and Bingham element to demonstrate the working principle.

Supplementary Information is contained as an attachment to the reprint-pdf.

Cite this publication as follows:
Boisly M, Kastner M, Brummund J, Ulbricht V: General aspects of yield stress fluids - Terminology and definition of viscosity, Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 14578.

Sergey Ilyin, Valery Kulichikhin, Alexander Malkin
Characterization of material viscoelasticity at large deformations

Appl. Rheol. 24:1 (2014) 13653 (10 pages)

Mechanical properties of various technological materials at large deformations are proposed to characterize by means of some generalized parameters obtained at large oscillation strains but not related to any definite rheological equations. The base for the analysis is the Lissajous- Bowditch figures in two coordinate systems - "stress - deformation" and "stress derivative with respect to the phase angle - deformation". An area of the first of these figures provides the well known integral estimation of dissipative losses in the deformation cycle while the second one presents the new integral measure of the matter's elasticity. The correlation between the proposed integral estimations of the "averaged" dynamic modulus and the values found in using Fourier and Chebyshev series was demonstrated. This integral method was applied for three suspensions of various types. The obtained results allowed for viewing the type of non-linearity: pseudo-plasticity or dilatancy, stiffening or softening, as functions of deformation.

Cite this publication as follows:
Ilyin S, Kulichikhin V, Malkin A: Characterization of material viscoelasticity at large deformations, Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 13653.

Meral Akkoyun, Christian Carrot, Benoit Blottiere
On the use of an internal mixer to study the impregnation of carbon fillers by organic liquids

Appl. Rheol. 24:1 (2014) 13487 (8 pages)

Impregnation of organic liquid electrolytes in conductive powders is of major importance in the field of energy storage devices such as batteries or super-capacitors. Impregnation during mixing and processing operations becomes usual for practical reasons and requires a better understanding of the changes of the rheological behavior of the mix. In this paper, the impregnation of propylene carbonate (PC) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in activated carbon (AC) and carbon black (CB) was studied by using an internal mixer. Monitoring of the torque of the filler/liquid blend as a function of the amount of liquid fed in the mixing chamber, enables to detect the transition from the solid friction of the dry powder to the lubricated liquid (or viscous) behaviour of the concentrated paste of wetted powder. The results were compared with data obtained by conventional nitrogen adsorption porosimetry combined with the knowledge of the molecular diameter of the liquids. A characteristic change was observed as soon as the liquid completely fills the porosity of the filler. Both tested liquids (DMSO and PC) impregnate more carbon black and the take-up rate is slightly higher for DMSO in comparison to PC because, as a polar liquid, DMSO has a better interaction with both fillers.

Cite this publication as follows:
Akkoyun M, Carrot C, Blottiere B: On the use of an internal mixer to study the impregnation of carbon fillers by organic liquids, Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 13487.

Alain Ponton, Claire Meyer, Guillaume Foyart, Luc Aymard, Karim Djellab
Structural and thermomechanical investigation of lyotropic liquid crystal phases doped with monodisperse microparticles

Appl. Rheol. 24:1 (2014) 14147 (7 pages)

We present a study of the structural and thermomechanical properties of lyotropic phase in the quasi ternary system made of Cetylpyridinium chloride (CPCl)/hexanol/salt water (0.9% by mass) with and without cobalt microparticles. Phase transition temperatures of the structural sequence isotropic L1/nematic calamitic Nc,/hexagonal H have been determined by differential scanning microcalorimetry. Temperature induced developable domains in hexagonal phase H and disclinations in calamitic nematic phase Nc were observed in crossed polar optical microscopy in confined geometry. A rheological study of calamitic nematic phase Nc highlighted structuring effect of cobalt microparticles from a concentration of 2% to be demonstrated by an increase in viscosity and viscoelastic moduli. This could be explained by a stabilization of disclinations.

Cite this publication as follows:
Ponton A, Meyer C, Foyart G, Aymard L, Djellab K: Structural and thermomechanical investigation of lyotropic liquid crystal phases doped with monodisperse microparticles, Appl. Rheol. 24 (2014) 14147.


© Applied Rheology 2019