Applied Rheology: Publications

Appl Rheol online available publications for selected issue

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Delegates of the national rheological societies
Society's Site Mar 2013 - Aug 2013

Appl. Rheol. 23:1 (2013) 62-69

Cite this publication as follows:
Rheological Societies: Society's Site Mar 2013 - Aug 2013, Appl. Rheol. 23 (2013) 62.

Nadia Antonova
4th Eurosummer School on biorheology & Symposium on micro and nanomechanics and mechanobiology of cells, tissues and systems

Appl. Rheol. 23:1 (2013) 57-58

Cite this publication as follows:
Antonova N: 4th Eurosummer School on biorheology & Symposium on micro and nanomechanics and mechanobiology of cells, tissues and systems, Appl. Rheol. 23 (2013) 57.

Sabu Thomas, Nandakumar Kalarikkal, Jithin Joy
Third International Conference on Natural Polymers (ICNP 2012)

Appl. Rheol. 23:1 (2013) 59-60

Cite this publication as follows:
Thomas S, Kalarikkal N, Joy J: Third International Conference on Natural Polymers (ICNP 2012), Appl. Rheol. 23 (2013) 59.

Ulrich Alexander Handge
Geesthacht Polymer Days Rheology and Mechanics of Polymer Materials

Appl. Rheol. 23:1 (2013) 60-61

Cite this publication as follows:
Handge UA: Geesthacht Polymer Days Rheology and Mechanics of Polymer Materials, Appl. Rheol. 23 (2013) 60.

Abdelhakim Benslimane, Karim Bekkour, Pierre Francois
Effect of addition of Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the rheology and flow properties of bentonite suspensions

Appl. Rheol. 23:1 (2013) 13475 (10 pages)

In this work, bentonite suspension and mixtures containing 5 wt% of bentonite and 0.1 and 0.5 wt% of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were investigated in terms of their rheology and hydrodynamic behaviour in pipe flow. All fluids exhibited non- Newtonian rheological behaviour that can be well described by the three parameters Herschel-Bulkley model. The axial velocity distribution was determined using ultrasonic pulsed Doppler velocimetry technique. In the laminar regime the flow parameters were predicted by integration of the constitutive rheological model used. In the turbulent flow, the Dodge and Metzner model was applied to fit the experimental data. The measurements of the friction factor showed a small amount of drag reduction for the pure bentonite suspension, whereas for the polymer.clay blend the drag reduction was more important.

Cite this publication as follows:
Benslimane A, Bekkour K, Francois P: Effect of addition of Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the rheology and flow properties of bentonite suspensions, Appl. Rheol. 23 (2013) 13475.

Amir Saadat, Hossein Nazockdast, Fatemeh Sepehr, Milad Mehranpoor
Viscoelastic modeling of extrudate swell of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene/Clay nanocomposite

Appl. Rheol. 23:1 (2013) 12131 (11 pages)

The aim of the present work was to predict the extrudate swelling behavior of organoclay containing Acrylonitrile- Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) nanocomposite. The modeling was performed on the basis of unconstrained recovery concept originally introduced by Tanner but employing Wagner viscoelastic model with generalized Wagner damping function which is believed to be capable of taking into account the effect of organoclay on viscoelastic properties of nanocomposite sample. This approach enabled us to evaluate the effect of organoclay on extrudate swell in terms of disentanglement kinetics and chain relaxation behavior. In our modeling, the effect of die entrance region on the extent of extrudate swelling was also considered. In order to evaluate the validity of our modeling, the extrudate swell was measured as a function of wall shear stress for samples varying in organoclay content. The results predicted from the model were found to be in relatively good agreement with the experimental results.

Cite this publication as follows:
Saadat A, Nazockdast H, Sepehr F, Mehranpoor M: Viscoelastic modeling of extrudate swell of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene/Clay nanocomposite, Appl. Rheol. 23 (2013) 12131.

L.A. Pereira de Oliveira, J.P. Castro Gomes, M.C.S. Nepomuceno
The influence of wastes materials on the rheology of rendering mortars

Appl. Rheol. 23:1 (2013) 15505 (11 pages)

The objective of this paper is to present the results of a research about the effect of mineral additions and specific lightweight aggregates obtained from wastes materials (crushed EPS and cork) on the rheological properties of renderings mortars. Four series of mortar formulations were prepared. Each series was composed by four mortars mixes with different mineral additions: hydrated lime, glass powder, tungsten mine waste mud, and metakaolin. The proportions of the mortars expressed in terms of apparent volume of cement, mineral addition and sand was 1:1:5. Flowability of mortar was measured using a standard flow table test. The density and the water retention capacity of mortars were also determined. The mortar rheological parameters were evaluated using a rheometer. The results show that the mortar yield stress is strongly influenced by the water amount, binder fineness and mineral addition nature. The mortars plastic viscosity is also influenced by the nature of mineral addition and the partial replacement of sand by EPS aggregates introduce incongruent values, caused by the segregation, in the mortar yield stress, whereas, the cork aggregates is responsible by the yield stress reduction.

Cite this publication as follows:
PereiradeOliveira LA, CastroGomes JP, Nepomuceno M: The influence of wastes materials on the rheology of rendering mortars, Appl. Rheol. 23 (2013) 15505.

Mohamed Ilies Bahlouli, Karim Bekkour, Adel Benchabane, Yacine Hemar, Ali Nemdili
The effect of temperature on the rheological behavior of polyethylene oxide (PEO) solutions

Appl. Rheol. 23:1 (2013) 13435 (15 pages)

The rheological properties of polyethylene oxide (PEO) solutions were investigated, at different temperatures, using small and large deformation rheological methods. Steady-state flow measurements showed that the flow behavior of the PEO solutions is well described by the Cross model, which yields the critical concentrations c* (from the dilute regime to semidilute regime) and c** (from the semi-dilute regime to the concentrated regime). In the range of the temperatures investigated here, the apparent viscosity is found to obey the Arrhenius equation below a critical temperature we believe corresponds to the cloud point temperature. Above the cloud point temperature, the viscosity increased with temperature. Similarly below the cloud point, both transient and dynamic tests showed that PEO solutions exhibit viscoelastic behavior, where both the elastic G' and viscous G'' modules increased with the increase in concentration and with the decrease in temperature. The Cox-Merz rule was found to apply to the PEO solutions at temperatures lower than the cloud point temperature, whilst divergence was reported after phase separation. The frequencies at which G' = G'', i.e. the reciprocal of the relaxation times of the temporary polymer network, was found to increase (the relaxation times decline) with decreasing polymer concentration, in agreement with the relaxation times, derived from the Cross model. In essence, this study demonstrates that it is possible to monitor accurately the cloud point temperature of PEO solutions by viscometric analysis.

Cite this publication as follows:
Bahlouli MI, Bekkour K, Benchabane A, Hemar Y, Nemdili A: The effect of temperature on the rheological behavior of polyethylene oxide (PEO) solutions, Appl. Rheol. 23 (2013) 13435.


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