Applied Rheology: Publications

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Horst Henning Winter
Rheology Cyberinfrastructure for Integrated Research and Learning at ARC07

Appl. Rheol. 17:5 (2007) 302-304

Cite this publication as follows:
Winter HH: Rheology Cyberinfrastructure for Integrated Research and Learning at ARC07, Appl. Rheol. 17 (2007) 302.

Johan Wiklund
The Nordic Rheology Society Conference 2007

Appl. Rheol. 17:5 (2007) 301-302

Cite this publication as follows:
Wiklund J: The Nordic Rheology Society Conference 2007, Appl. Rheol. 17 (2007) 301.

Josephine Ruddle
Australian Centre for Geomechanics (ACG) Rheology Workshop 2007

Appl. Rheol. 17:5 (2007) 299-299

Cite this publication as follows:
Ruddle J: Australian Centre for Geomechanics (ACG) Rheology Workshop 2007, Appl. Rheol. 17 (2007) 299.

Mourad Lounis
Fourth International Symposium of Rheology, CIR04

Appl. Rheol. 17:5 (2007) 297-298

Cite this publication as follows:
Lounis M: Fourth International Symposium of Rheology, CIR04, Appl. Rheol. 17 (2007) 297.

Thomas Schweizer
Structure and rheology of molten polymers (J.M. Dealy, R.G. Larson)

Appl. Rheol. 17:5 (2007) 258-259

Cite this publication as follows:
Schweizer T: Structure and rheology of molten polymers (J.M. Dealy, R.G. Larson), Appl. Rheol. 17 (2007) 258.

Velichko Hristov, John Vlachopoulos
A Study of Entrance Pressure Loss in Filled Polymer Melts

Appl. Rheol. 17:5 (2007) 57191 (9 pages)

The influence of the molecular structure of the polymer matrix and filler loading on the entrance pressure loss of polyethylene/ wood flour composites has been investigated in this research by means of a capillary rheometer equipped with an orifice die. The entry flow of talc- and glass-filled polyethylene composites has been investigated as well. It was found that the entrance pressure loss of wood filled polyethylene composites greatly increased with increasing the wood flour loading. Talc and solid glass spheres also increase the entrance pressure loss, however not as much as wood flour. It was also observed that composites based on narrow molecular weight distribution (MWD) resins exhibited larger entrance pressure loss than the broad MWD and branched polyethylene based ones. It was concluded that measurements of the entrance pressure loss reveal some interesting features of the polymer-filler interactions and could provide significant insights in the processing of highly filled polymer melts.

Cite this publication as follows:
Hristov V, Vlachopoulos J: A Study of Entrance Pressure Loss in Filled Polymer Melts , Appl. Rheol. 17 (2007) 57191.

Dimitri Feys, Ronny Verhoeven, Geert De Schutter
Evaluation of time independent rheological models applicable to fresh Self-Compacting Concrete

Appl. Rheol. 17:5 (2007) 56244 (10 pages)

Self-Compacting Concrete is a new type of concrete which is more liquid compared to traditional concrete and which does not need any form of external compaction. As a result this type of concrete is suitable for a new placing technique: pumping SCC from the bottom in the formwork and letting it rise in the formwork due to the applied pressure. In order to understand the phenomena occurring during pumping operations, the rheological properties of SCC must be investigated and controlled. Tests have been performed with two different rheometers, which are described in this paper. For the Tattersall Mk-II rheometer, a calibration procedure has been worked out to eliminate secondary flows in the rheometer.Test results indicate that SCC is a thixotropic liquid, having a yield stress, showing shear thickening and having varying properties in time due to the occurring chemical reactions. In this paper, the time dependent effects will not be described. When trying to apply a rheological model to the obtained results, only the modified Bingham model seems appropriate. Applying the Bingham model results in the generation of negative yield stresses while the Herschel-Bulkley model has a parameter with a variable dimension and has a major mathematical restriction. The rheological properties of fresh SCC can be described with the modified Bingham model. A suitable parameter to describe shear thickening is defined as the ratio of the second order term in the shear rate of the modified Bingham model to the linear term (= c/μ).

Cite this publication as follows:
Feys D, Verhoeven R, DeSchutter G: Evaluation of time independent rheological models applicable to fresh Self-Compacting Concrete, Appl. Rheol. 17 (2007) 56244.

Nikolaos Katsikis, Tobias Königer, Helmut Münstedt
Elongational viscosities of polymethylmethacrylate / nano-clay composites

Appl. Rheol. 17:5 (2007) 52751 (9 pages)

The elongational flow of polymethylmethacrylate / nano-clay composites was studied during stressing and creep experiments using a Müt tensile rheometer (MTR). The dispersion of the nano-clay was controlled by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the layer distance was measured with X-ray diffraction (XRD).With growing volume fraction of the filler an increase of the viscosity is observed under constant strain rate and constant stress conditions. The results for the elongational viscosities for both modes are consistent with each other. Furthermore, a strain softening behavior can be measured, which is the more pronounced the higher the nano-clay content is. As the Trouton rule is not valid, deviations from the linear behaviour are related to an envolope curve for the elongational viscosities instead of the threefold zero shear viscosity.

Cite this publication as follows:
Katsikis N, Koniger T, Munstedt H: Elongational viscosities of polymethylmethacrylate / nano-clay composites, Appl. Rheol. 17 (2007) 52751.

Kyung C. Kwon, YoonKook Park, Tamara Floyd, Nader Vahdat, Erica Jackson, Paul Jones
Rheological Characterization of Shear-Thinning Fluids with a Novel Viscosity Equation of a Tank-tube Viscometer

Appl. Rheol. 17:5 (2007) 51413 (9 pages)

A tank-tube viscometer and its novel viscosity equation were developed to determine flow characteristics of non-Newtonian fluids. The objective of this research is to test capabilities of the tank-tube viscometer and its novel non-Newtonian viscosity equation by characterizing rheological behaviors of well-known polyethylene oxide (MW 8000000) aqueous solutions as non-Newtonian fluids with 60-w% sucrose aqueous solution as a reference calibration fluid. Non-Newtonian characteristics of 0.3 - 0.7 wt% polyethylene oxide aqueous solutions were extensively investigated with the tank-tube viscometer and its non-Newtonian viscosity equation over the 294 - 306 K temperature range, and 55 - 784 s-1 shear rate range. The 60-w% sucrose aqueous solution was used as a reference/calibration fluid for the tank-tube viscometer. Dynamic viscosity values of 60 w% sucrose aqueous solution were determined with the calibrated tank-tube viscometer and its Newtonian viscosity equation at 299.15 K, and compared with the literature values.

Cite this publication as follows:
Kwon KC, Park Y, Floyd T, Vahdat N, Jackson E, Jones P: Rheological Characterization of Shear-Thinning Fluids with a Novel Viscosity Equation of a Tank-tube Viscometer, Appl. Rheol. 17 (2007) 51413.


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