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Patrick Ilg
Models for polymeric and anisotropic liquids (M. Kröger)

Appl. Rheol. 16:1 (2006) 12-13

Cite this publication as follows:
Ilg P: Models for polymeric and anisotropic liquids (M. Kröger), Appl. Rheol. 16 (2006) 12.

A.T. Vendrusculo, D. Hotza, C.M. Gomes, M.G.N. Quadri
Rheology of Star Fruit Pulp (Averrhoa Carambola L.)

Appl. Rheol. 16:1 (2006) 26-31

Rheological properties of food fluids are useful for quality control, texture evaluation, and food structure determination. The rheological behavior is dependent on the size, form and concentration of solids in suspension and the system structure. Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola L.) pulp was obtained from the crude fruit and treated enzymatically, pasteurized and homogenized at 11000 rpm for 2 min and 22000 rpm for 5 min. The pulp presented Newtonian characteristics with R2 values greater than 0.98. Enzymatic treatment under 55 C for 1 h reduced the crude pulp viscosity from 1.84 to 1.22 mPa.s. Pasteurization under 100 C for 10 min increased the viscosity at around 26% in relation to the crude pulp, resulting in a turbid and homogeneous product. To evaluate the influence of the insoluble solids, filtration or concentration to 50% from the initial volume were carried out using laboratory procedures. Filtration of the pasteurized pulp promoted a viscosity decrease of 60% while concentration increased the viscosity from 2.28 to 7.98 mPa.s

Cite this publication as follows:
Vendrusculo AT, Hotza D, Gomes CM, Quadri MGN: Rheology of Star Fruit Pulp (Averrhoa Carambola L.), Appl. Rheol. 16 (2006) 26.

H. Roos, U. Bolmstedt, A. Axelsson
Evaluation of New Methods and Measuring Systems for Characterisation of Flow Behaviour of Complex Foods

Appl. Rheol. 16:1 (2006) 19-25

Conventional methods often impose difficulties when measuring the viscosity of fluids containing particles or fibres, e.g. tomato paste or fruit preparations, mainly due to the narrow gaps of the viscometer. In order to solve these problems different geometries have been developed, e.g. different mixer systems and wide gap double concentric cylinders. However, these can not be evaluated assuming a constant shear rate throughout the fluid. In this study, three different kinds of mixer systems have been studied; a small and a large paddle and a helix. For the mixer systems an average shear rate must be determined and a quotient between torque and shear stress must be found. In addition, a wide gap double concentric cylinder (DCC) was examined and evaluated using two different methods. When evaluating the mixer systems a method based on the Couette analogy has been used successfully for a number of complex fluids, including prepared sauces and fruit samples containing particles of different size. The DCC has been evaluated using a numerical as well as an approximate method, both giving results of good accuracy. All systems had the limitation that no consistent results were obtained for tomato paste. However, when starch was added to the diluted tomato paste dispersion, satisfying results were once again obtained.

Cite this publication as follows:
Roos H, Bolmstedt U, Axelsson A: Evaluation of New Methods and Measuring Systems for Characterisation of Flow Behaviour of Complex Foods, Appl. Rheol. 16 (2006) 19.

V. Pavlinek, P. Saha, K. Perez-Gonzalez, L. de Vargas, J. Stejskal, O. Quadrat
Analysis of the Yielding Behavior of Electrorheological Suspensions by Controlled Shear Stress Experiments

Appl. Rheol. 16:1 (2006) 14-18

The yielding behavior of two model electrorheological suspensions of uncoated silica particles and silica coated with polyaniline base in silicone oil using controlled shear rate and controlled shear stress experiments has been analyzed. The results demonstrate that unlike the uncertain dynamic yield stress values estimated from the results obtained in the former mode by extrapolation of the unsteady shear stresses to zero shear rate, the controlled shear stress measurement permits to detect sensitively the region starting from the initial rupture of particle chain structure in the electric field at rest corresponding to a static yield stress and ending in total breakage of suspension structure at a breaking stress. The latter quantity can be detected with a good accuracy and proved to be a reliable criterion of the stiffness of electrorheological (ER) structure.

Cite this publication as follows:
Pavlinek V, Saha P, Perez-Gonzalez J, DeVargas L, Stejskal J, Quadrat O: Analysis of the Yielding Behavior of Electrorheological Suspensions by Controlled Shear Stress Experiments, Appl. Rheol. 16 (2006) 14.

Kamalesh Prasad
Chemical and Rheological Studies on Seaweed Polysaccharides (PhD Thesis)

Appl. Rheol. 16:1 (2006) 32-34

The main aim of the work is to study the physicochemical and rheological behaviour of agar gel extracted from a red seaweed Gelidiella acerosa collected from various locations and seasons in southeast coast and west coast of India. The thesis also deals with the rheological studies of agar gels in presence of various additives including surfactants and fatty acids as well as agar and carrageenan based film-forming dispersions. The observed shear viscosity values were correlated with existing rheological models. It was observed from the shear viscosity studies that agar gel become more gel thinning in presence of non ionic surfactants as well as in presence of fatty acids. Oscillation sweep measurements revealed that the agar gel become liquid like in presence of nonionic surfactants and opposite is true in presence of ionic surfactants. The film forming dispersions prepared from agar and plasticizers had inferior rheological behaviour in comparison to k-carrageenan based thin film forming dispersions. All the agar gel samples collected from various locations displayed different rheological behaviours.

Cite this publication as follows:
Prasad K: Chemical and Rheological Studies on Seaweed Polysaccharides (PhD Thesis), Appl. Rheol. 16 (2006) 32.

Peter Fischer, Martin Kroger
Patents Review (Feb 2006)

Appl. Rheol. 16:1 (2006) 40-41

Cite this publication as follows:
Fischer P, Kroger M: Patents Review (Feb 2006), Appl. Rheol. 16 (2006) 40.

Delegates of the national rheological societies
Society's Site Mar 2006 - Aug 2006

Appl. Rheol. 16:1 (2006) 46-55

Cite this publication as follows:
Rheological Societies: Society's Site Mar 2006 - Aug 2006, Appl. Rheol. 16 (2006) 46.

E.S. Boek, J.T. Padding
CECAM Workshop on Structure and Rheology of Self-Assembling and Aggregating Colloidal Suspensions: Theory, Simulation and Experiment

Appl. Rheol. 16:1 (2006) 35-36

Cite this publication as follows:
Boek ES, Padding JT: CECAM Workshop on Structure and Rheology of Self-Assembling and Aggregating Colloidal Suspensions: Theory, Simulation and Experiment, Appl. Rheol. 16 (2006) 35.


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