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Peter Fischer
Physics of Continuous Matter - Exotic and Everyday Phenomena in the Macroscopic World (B. Lautrup)

Appl. Rheol. 15:6 (2005) 369

Cite this publication as follows:
Fischer P: Physics of Continuous Matter - Exotic and Everyday Phenomena in the Macroscopic World (B. Lautrup), Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 369.

Martin Kroger
Publication Specific Impact of Articles Published by Rheological Journals

Appl. Rheol. 15:6 (2005) 406-409

The Impact Factor of a journal is a quantitative way of assessing its worth and relevance to the academic community it serves. Many librarians see the ratio between Impact Factor and price as a suitable yardstick by which to measure the value of their collections. In addition, the research assessment exercises which, in many countries, are now being carried out on a more formal basis mean that authors submitting original research must publish it in a journal with the highest perceived worth possible in order to secure future funding, job promotions and peer recognition. It has been suspected [T. Opthof, Cardiovasc. Res. 33 (1997) 1; J. Stegmann, Nature 390 (1990) 550], however, that a particular author's impact is not much related to the journals in which her/he publishes. As will be demonstrated in this letter, the impact of articles published in rheological journals is largely influenced by criteria such as length of article, number of authors, number of cited references.

Cite this publication as follows:
Kroger M: Publication Specific Impact of Articles Published by Rheological Journals, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 406.

Shewaferaw Shibeshi, William E. Collins
The Rheology of Blood Flow in a Branched Arterial System

Appl. Rheol. 15:6 (2005) 398-405

Blood flow rheology is a complex phenomenon. Presently there is no universally agreed upon model to represent the viscous property of blood. However, under the general classification of non-Newtonian models that simulate blood behavior to different degrees of accuracy, there are many variants. The power law, Casson and Carreau models are popular non-Newtonian models and affect hemodynamics quantities under many conditions. In this study, the finite volume method is used to investigate hemodynamics predictions of each of the models. To implement the finite volume method, the computational fluid dynamics software Fluent 6.1 is used. In this numerical study the different hemorheological models are found to predict different results of hemodynamics variables which are known to impact the genesis of atherosclerosis and formation of thrombosis. The axial velocity magnitude percentage difference of up to 2 % and radial velocity difference up to 90 % is found at different sections of the T-junction geometry. The size of flow recirculation zones and their associated separation and reattachment point's locations differ for each model. The wall shear stress also experiences up to 12 % shift in the main tube. A velocity magnitude distribution of the grid cells shows that the Newtonian model is close dynamically to the Casson model while the power law model resembles the Carreau model.

Cite this publication as follows:
Shibeshi SS, Collins WE: The Rheology of Blood Flow in a Branched Arterial System, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 398.

Jun Sato, Victor Breedveld
Evaporation Blocker for Cone-Plate Rheometry of Volatile Samples

Appl. Rheol. 15:6 (2005) 390-397

We report on the design and implementation of an evaporation blocker for cone-plate and plate-plate geometries. In addition to minimizing sample evaporation by trapping the saturated vapor inside a sample chamber, an important feature of the evaporation blocker is the suppression of solvent transport through condensation. Validation tests with DI-water, hydrogels, and colloidal suspensions demonstrate that the new accessory reduces solvent evaporation significantly more than commercially available environmental control chambers. Experiments were also performed to show that the evaporation blocker enables a variety of experiments on thermoresponsive complex fluids that were previously impossible, and provide new insight into the molecular organization of these materials. The evaporation blocker was specifically designed for an Anton Paar MCR rheometer, but the fundamental principles are widely applicable.

Cite this publication as follows:
Sato J, Breedveld V: Evaporation Blocker for Cone-Plate Rheometry of Volatile Samples, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 390.

Anshuman Roy, Ronald G. Larson
A Mean Flow Model for Polymer and Fiber Turbulent Drag Reduction

Appl. Rheol. 15:6 (2005) 370-389

We present a one-parameter model that fits quantitatively the mean velocity profiles from experiments and numerical simulations of drag-reduced wall-bounded flows of dilute solutions of polymers and non-Brownian fibers in the low and modest drag reduction regime. The model is based on a viscous mechanism of drag reduction, in which either extended polymers or non-Brownian fibers increase the extensional viscosity of the fluid and thereby suppress both small and large turbulent eddies and reduce momentum transfer to the wall, resulting in drag reduction. Our model provides a rheological interpretation of the upward parallel shift S+ in the mean velocity profile upon addition of polymer, observed by Virk. We show that Virk's correlations for the dependence on polymer molecular weight and concentration of the onset wall shear stress and slope increment on the Prandtl-Karman plot can be translated to two dimensionless numbers, namely an onset Weissenberg number and an asymptotic Trouton ratio of maximum extensional viscosity to zero-shear viscosity. We believe that our model, while simple, captures the essential features of drag reduction that are universal to flexible polymers and fibers, and, unlike the Virk phenomenology, can easily be extended to flows with inhomogeneous polymer or fiber concentration fields.

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Cite this publication as follows:
Roy A, Larson RG: A Mean Flow Model for Polymer and Fiber Turbulent Drag Reduction, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 370.

Peter Fischer
4th Pacific Rim Conference on Rheology (PRCR 4), Shanghai/China

Appl. Rheol. 15:6 (2005) 412

Cite this publication as follows:
Fischer P: 4th Pacific Rim Conference on Rheology (PRCR 4), Shanghai/China, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 412.

Peter Fischer
Processing of High Viscous Materials, Schkopau/Germany

Appl. Rheol. 15:6 (2005) 410

Cite this publication as follows:
Fischer P: Processing of High Viscous Materials, Schkopau/Germany, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 410.

Peter Fischer, Martin Kroger
Patents Review (December 2005)

Appl. Rheol. 15:6 (2005) 414

Cite this publication as follows:
Fischer P, Kroger M: Patents Review (December 2005), Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 414.


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