Applied Rheology: Publications

Appl Rheol online available publications for selected issue

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Delegates of the national rheological societies
Society's Site Sep 2005 - Feb 2006

Appl. Rheol. 15:4 (2005) 252-265

Cite this publication as follows:
Rheological Societies, Mielke W, Coussot P, Mavrantzas VG, Wagner MH, Zatloukal M: Society's Site Sep 2005 - Feb 2006, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 252.

Peter Fischer, Martin Kroger
Patents Review (Aug 2005)

Appl. Rheol. 15:4 (2005) 244-246

Cite this publication as follows:
Fischer P, Kroger M: Patents Review (Aug 2005), Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 244.

Frank Peters
CECAM Workshop on Modeling and Simulation of Entangled Polymeric Liquids

Appl. Rheol. 15:4 (2005) 240-241

Cite this publication as follows:
Peters F: CECAM Workshop on Modeling and Simulation of Entangled Polymeric Liquids, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 240.

J. Stange
Workshop Rheology and Processing of Polymers

Appl. Rheol. 15:4 (2005) 238-239

Cite this publication as follows:
Stange J: Workshop Rheology and Processing of Polymers, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 238.

Luigi Coppola, Isabella Nicotera, Cesare Oliviero
Dynamic Rheological Analysis of MLVs and Lamellar Phases in the System C_12 E_4/D_2O

Appl. Rheol. 15:4 (2005) 230-237

The mechanical properties of the lamellar phase, La, of the system C_12 E_4/D_2O were studied along an isoplethal path (30 wt% C_12 E_4) in the temperature range 10 - 60 C. A dynamic analysis was determined by small strain oscillatory rheometry. The multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) (onions) were transformed by shearing the lamellar phase. The micellar phase was investigated by steady and dynamic rheological experiments. The micellar aggregate size increases slightly upon heating and the transition from micelles to lamellae appears to be a first order transition. The mechanical spectra of the lamellar phase show a strong dependence of the moduli on the frequency. This is typical of defective lamellar phases. They are different from MLVs mechanical spectra. The MLVs viscous and storage moduli are almost independent from the frequency and they exhibit the characteristics of a strong gel. The temperature of formation of the MLVs phase influences the mechanical properties of the MLVs. Three different packing states of the MLVs phase were observed in the temperature range 25 - 55 C.

Cite this publication as follows:
Coppola L, Nicotera I, Oliviero C: Dynamic Rheological Analysis of MLVs and Lamellar Phases in the System C_12 E_4/D_2O, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 230.

Paolo Perona
Bostwick Degree and Rheological Properties: an Up-to-date Viewpoint

Appl. Rheol. 15:4 (2005) 218-229

The correlation between the Bostwick degree and the static rheological properties of yield stress food fuids is first revisited and then reformulated in this work. The role of the yield stress in the free surface flow of the Bostwick test is studied using dimensional analysis. Results from experiments on 48 different samples of yield stress fluids are considered and included to check the adequacy of the proposed correlation. Asymptotic dynamic behaviour is also presented and discussed as a mechanism of complete self similarity with respect of the dimensionless time. This approach would seem to support the opinions in favor of the yield stress as a key parameter, and thus offers an interesting new viewpoint useful to both future experiments on the Bostwick test and studies of 'dam-break' like dynamics.

Cite this publication as follows:
Perona P: Bostwick Degree and Rheological Properties: an Up-to-date Viewpoint, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 218.

J. Götz, L. Rewesa, M. Walch, A. Geissler
Influence of an Ultrasonic Treatment on the Structure and Flow Behaviour of Oxide Ceramic Masses

Appl. Rheol. 15:4 (2005) 204-217

Oxide ceramic masses are used for catalysts and catalyst carriers. For a reliable processing hydrocolloids (e. g. cellulose) are usually added in order to decelerate demixing phenomena. Oxide ceramic masses react to simple shearing with hardening (peptisation: increase of the shear stress with the shear deformation) [1]. The present study analyses, if an ultrasonic treatment has also an impact on the structure, the shelf-life (in the green state), the correlated flow behaviour of oxide ceramic masses and presumably (not tested) the mechanical properties in the hardened, sintered state. The idea of using ultrasonic treatment is to change the microstructure (see below) and, therefore, to minimise or even give up the standard addition of stabilizers to minimize demixing in aqueous oxide ceramic suspensions. Besides the additional costs of an extra process unit, stabilisers cause often deteriorated mechanical properties (porosity, crack behaviour) of the ceramics in the hardened state after the sintering. Therefore, pump experiments (apparent viscosity), oscillatory (G´ and G´´) and steady shear experiments (h), particle-size analysis (particle-size distribution, agglomerate strength), light microscopy, decanting experiments and pH-determinations have been performed. The obtained results show, that the hardening of the apparent viscosity (derived from the flow) during pump experiments with simultaneous ultrasonic treatment in a flow cell is combined with an increase of the fine fraction, the formation of enlarged, but smoother agglomerates, the change of the pH-value and the evolution of a three-dimensional network (gelling). All these processes increase both the amount of bound/immobilised (chemically or physically bound by or onto the solidsurfaces) and of retained water (interior of agglomerates and/or the pores of the flowand ultrasonic-induced network). This means that the volume fraction of the rheologically "free" water decreases and simultaneously the effective solid volume fraction increases. With respect to the concept of the rheologically effective solid fraction this is combined with an increasing viscosity. At the same time the tendency of demixing decreases significantly. Thus, by an appropriate combination of shear flow and ultrasonic treatment, the aqueous oxide ceramic suspensions are stabilised and a reliable processing of the initially problematic solid/fluid mixtures can be realised without stabilisers (eluding their negative consequences with respect to the quality of the sintered state).

Cite this publication as follows:
Gotz J, Rewese L, Walch M, Geissler A: Influence of an Ultrasonic Treatment on the Structure and Flow Behaviour of Oxide Ceramic Masses, Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 204.

Thomas Schweizer
Polymer Viscoelasticity (Yn-Hwang Lin)

Appl. Rheol. 15:4 (2005) 202-203

Cite this publication as follows:
Schweizer T: Polymer Viscoelasticity (Yn-Hwang Lin), Appl. Rheol. 15 (2005) 202.


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