Applied Rheology: Publications

Appl Rheol online available publications for selected issue

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Delegates of the national rheological societies
Society's Site Mar 2004 - Aug 2004

Appl. Rheol. 14:1 (2004) 55-63

Cite this publication as follows:
Rheological Societies, Emri I, Mielke W, Fischer P, Boudouvis A, Dupuis D: Society's Site Mar 2004 - Aug 2004 , Appl. Rheol. 14 (2004) 55.

Dr. J.H. Watson
The Diabolical Case of the Recurring Yield Stress

Appl. Rheol. 14:1 (2004) 40-45

The yield stress has, since its conception, been a source of fierce and often acrimonious debate. This review article deals with the issue, looking at problems related to the meaning of the definition, timescale of the observation, whether the yield stress is a property of concentrated suspensions or is linked to the strength of coherent network structures. We discuss the problematic nature of how to measure the yield stress, directly or indirectly, and examples of the vane geometry are given. Throughout, absolutist and realist theories and evidence are presented and a consensus is finally drawn. Rheologists should embrace the consequences of the absolutist and realist theories and apply them to their everyday world - whatever the timescale!

Cite this publication as follows:
Watson JH: The Diabolical Case of the Recurring Yield Stress, Appl. Rheol. 14 (2004) 40.

David Boger
Introduction to The Diabolical Case of the Recurring Yield Stress

Appl. Rheol. 14:1 (2004) 40a

Cite this publication as follows:
Boger DV: Introduction to The Diabolical Case of the Recurring Yield Stress, Appl. Rheol. 14 (2004) 40a.

Edwin C. Cua, Montgomery T. Shaw
Creeping Sphere-Plane Squeeze Flow to Determine the Zero-Shear-Rate viscosity of HDPE Melts

Appl. Rheol. 14:1 (2004) 33-39

A creeping squeeze flow apparatus [1 - 2] was modified with a Fizeau interferometer optical motion transducer and equipped with a high-temperature, high-vacuum enclosure. Long-term squeeze flow experiments were done on a broad-MW, 1 melt-flow index commercial HDPE at 190.C, with runs covering about a week. Over this period, no thermal degradation of the polymer was observed, and the geometry of the apparatus was stable. Low-shear-rate viscosities were measured within the maximum shear rates from 1.7 ¥ 10-5 to 7.6 ¥ 10-5 1/s (stress ~ 1.7 to 8 Pa), resulting in an two-decade expansion in the experimental window for this difficult-to-characterize HDPE resin with long relaxation times.

Cite this publication as follows:
Cua EC, Shaw MT: Creeping Sphere-Plane Squeeze Flow to Determine the Zero-Shear-Rate viscosity of HDPE Melts, Appl. Rheol. 14 (2004) 33.

Piyush G. Gigras, Bamim Khomami
An Evaluation of Single-Segment Reptation Theories for Linear Entangled Polymeric Systems

Appl. Rheol. 14:1 (2004) 22-32

A short synopsis of the recently proposed reptation models based on the Doi and Edwards. tube concept is provided. Specifically, a critical examination of a number of theories like the .simplified. Mead-Larson-Doi model, the Ötinger model and the .Double Convection Reptation. model of Marrucci and coworkers has been performed. These models have been chosen due the fact that are computationally tractable as they mimic the chain dynamics in the tube using unconnected portions of the chain in a mean field way. Overall, we find each of these models to be equally competitive barring a few exceptional cases, where it is suspected that certain critical assumptions, made during the formulation of the model could lead to inaccurate predictions under transient or Lagrangian unsteady settings.

Cite this publication as follows:
Gigras PG, Khomami B: An Evaluation of Single-Segment Reptation Theories for Linear Entangled Polymeric Systems, Appl. Rheol. 14 (2004) 22.

R. Rotondi, S. Succi, G. Bella
Direct Simulation of Fluid Transport at Solid Interfaces with a Multiscale Lattice-Boltzmann Finite-Volume Method

Appl. Rheol. 14:1 (2004) 12-21

It is shown that the combined use of a mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann solver with finite-volume techniques, both enriched with local-refinement (multiscale) capabilities, permits to describe transport phenomena at fluid-solid interfaces to a degree of detail which may help dispensing with empirical correlations.

Cite this publication as follows:
Rotondi R, Succi S, Bella G: Direct Simulation of Fluid Transport at Solid Interfaces with a Multiscale Lattice-Boltzmann Finite-Volume Method, Appl. Rheol. 14 (2004) 12.

Thomas Vilgis
An Introduction to Elastomer Molecular Network Theory (Arthur L. Lodge)

Appl. Rheol. 14:1 (2004) 11

Cite this publication as follows:
Vilgis T: An Introduction to Elastomer Molecular Network Theory (Arthur L. Lodge), Appl. Rheol. 14 (2004) 11.

Walter Richtering
Nanoscience:Friction and Rheology on the Nanometer Scale (E. Meyer, R.M. Overney, K. Dransfeld, T. Gyalog)

Appl. Rheol. 14:1 (2004) 10

Cite this publication as follows:
Richtering W: Nanoscience:Friction and Rheology on the Nanometer Scale (E. Meyer, R.M. Overney, K. Dransfeld, T. Gyalog), Appl. Rheol. 14 (2004) 10.


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