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Peter Van Puyvelde, Paula Moldenaers
Sunny Rheology School in Leuven

Appl. Rheol. 13:6 (2003) 317

Cite this publication as follows:
VanPuyvelde P, Moldenaers P: Sunny Rheology School in Leuven, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 317.

Evan Mitsoulis
PPS 2003 Europe/Africa Regional Meeting

Appl. Rheol. 13:6 (2003) 316

Cite this publication as follows:
Mitsoulis E: PPS 2003 Europe/Africa Regional Meeting, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 316.

Nadia Antonova
12th European Conference on Clinical Hemorheology

Appl. Rheol. 13:6 (2003) 313-315

Cite this publication as follows:
Antonova N: 12th European Conference on Clinical Hemorheology, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 313.

G.A.M. Pop, W.J. Hop, M. van der Jagt, J. Quak, D. Dekkers, Z. Chang, F.J. Gijsen, D.J. Dunncker, C.J. Slager
Blood Electrical Impedance Closely Matches Whole Blood Viscosity as Parameter of Hemorheology and Inflammation

Appl. Rheol. 13:6 (2003) 305-312

Red blood cell aggregation (RBCa) is a sensitive inflammation marker. RBCa determination from erythrocyte sedimentation rate, ESR, is used since long, but is unspecific unless corrected for hematocrit, Ht. Whole blood viscosity measurement at low shear rate is also sensitive to RBCa but is cumbersome to apply. To investigate whether electrical blood impedance, being sensitive to spatial red cell distribution, can be a good alternative to determine RBCa in low shear conditions. Blood was collected from 7 healthy volunteers. From each 16 different samples were prepared with 4 different Ht.s and with 4 different fibrinogen concentrations. Viscosity was measured at low shear rate (4.04 s-1) with a rotational viscometer at 37.C. Electrical blood impedance was measured during similar shear conditions and temperature in a specially designed cuvette. ESR was determined according to Westergren. A logarithmic increase of viscosity as well as of capacitance, Cm, is seen when fibrinogen rises and an exponential increase when Ht rises. However, ESR shows a logarithmic decrease with increasing Ht and an exponential increase when fibrinogen rises. The viscosity could be accurately described using an exponential model. Under similar low shear conditions and temperature in-vitro, either whole blood viscosity or electrical blood capacitance reflect red blood cell aggregation due to fibrinogen and Ht variation in a similar way.

Cite this publication as follows:
Pop GAM, Hop WJ, Moraru L, vanderJagt M, Wuak J, Dekkers D, Chang Z, Gijsen FJ, Duncker DJ, Slager CJ: Blood Electrical Impedance Closely Matches Whole Blood Viscosity as Parameter of Hemorheology and Inflammation, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 305.

P.Mederic, M. Moan, M.-H. Klopffer, Y. Saint-Gerard
Talc filled thermoplastic composites: Melt rheological properties

Appl. Rheol. 13:6 (2003) 297-304

The effects of composition and resulting morphology on the rheology of thermoplastics filled with different talc platelets were studied in the 0-22% range of volume fraction, F. The sufficiently filled polymer composites exhibit a rheological behavior which significantly differs from the pure polymers used in this work, a linear low density polyethylene, a low density polyethylene and a polyamide 12. The changes in the rheological behavior are influenced by the size, the concentration and the surface treatment of plate-like talc particles. They also depend on the chemical nature and viscous and elastic characteristics of the polymer matrix. In particular, the effect of platelet orientation on the viscoelastic properties of reinforced composites was pointed out. For sufficiently filled systems, a low frequency response indicative of a pseudo solid-like behavior is obtained only during the first frequency sweep. In fact, the low frequency storage modulus, G., is constant. With repeated frequency sweeps, more platelets were aligned in the flow direction, thus the low frequency storage modulus gradually decreases.

Cite this publication as follows:
Mederic P, Moan M, Klopffer M-H, Saint-Gerard Y: Talc filled thermoplastic composites: Melt rheological properties, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 297.

Jure Marn, Primoz Ternik
Use of Quadratic Model for Modelling of Fly Ash-Water Mixture

Appl. Rheol. 13:6 (2003) 286-296

Novel approach to rheological modelling of a fly ash-water mixture is proposed. The model is first tested against the available experimental data for a corn starch-water, a glass beads-water and a fly ash-water mixture and then used taking the advantage of available CFD code for a calculation of major and minor losses. Numerical results for Quadratic model are compared with results for Power law.

Cite this publication as follows:
Marn J, Ternik P: Use of Quadratic Model for Modelling of Fly Ash-Water Mixture, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 286.

Thomas Schweizer
Flow of polyolefine melts through dies,investigated by laser Doppler anemometry (Martin Schwetz)

Appl. Rheol. 13:6 (2003) 284-285

Cite this publication as follows:
Schweizer T: Flow of polyolefine melts through dies,investigated by laser Doppler anemometry (Martin Schwetz), Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 284.

Thomas Schweizer
Influence of the molecular structure on the rheological properties of polystyrene and polycarbonate melts (Jens Hepperle)

Appl. Rheol. 13:6 (2003) 284a

Cite this publication as follows:
Schweizer T: Influence of the molecular structure on the rheological properties of polystyrene and polycarbonate melts (Jens Hepperle), Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 284a.


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