Applied Rheology: Publications

Appl Rheol online available publications for selected issue

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Delegates of the national rheological societies
Society's Site Sep 2003 - Feb 2004

Appl. Rheol. 13:4 (2003) 223-229

Cite this publication as follows:
Rheological Societies: Society's Site Sep 2003 - Feb 2004, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 223.

Robert G. Owens
Report on the XIIIth International Workshop on Numerical Methods for non-Newtonian Flows

Appl. Rheol. 13:4 (2003) 216-217

Cite this publication as follows:
Owens RG: Report on the XIIIth International Workshop on Numerical Methods for non-Newtonian Flows, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 216.

Niall W.G. Young
Review of Nordic Rheology Conference 2003

Appl. Rheol. 13:4 (2003) 214-215

Cite this publication as follows:
Young NWG: Review of Nordic Rheology Conference 2003, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 214.

Josephine Ruddle
ACG First Minerals Processing and Tailings Rheology Workshop

Appl. Rheol. 13:4 (2003) 212-213

Cite this publication as follows:
Ruddle J: ACG First Minerals Processing and Tailings Rheology Workshop, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 212.

Dimiter Hadjistamov
The Yield Stress - A New Point of View. Letter to Editors.

Appl. Rheol. 13:4 (2003) 209-211

Cite this publication as follows:
Hadjistamov D: The Yield Stress - A New Point of View. Letter to Editors., Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 209.

Jose Gines Hernandez Cifre, Jose Garcia de la Torre
Radiation Scattering by Dilute Polymer Solutions in Shear Flow: An Example of Mesoscale Modeling and Brownian Dynamics Simulation

Appl. Rheol. 13:4 (2003) 200-208

The intention of the paper is to illustrate the ability of the Brownian dynamics simulation technique applied to mesoscale polymer models in order to reproduce light scattering experiments of dilute polymer solution under flow. After suitable parameterization of a real polymeric system, polystyrene solved in a oligostyrene/toluene mixture at 299 K (good solvent conditions), a bead-spring model of the polymer chain is built and used to generate molecular trajectories on a computer. Such trajectories will capture the deformational and orientational processes experienced by the real polymer chain under flow. Then, from the set of molecular conformations generated, several polymer properties as well as typical scattering patterns can be reproduced quite accurately. FENE springs were used and excluded volume and non-preaveraging hydrodynamic interaction were taken into account in order to build a chain model as realistic as needed.

Cite this publication as follows:
HernandezCifre JG, delaTorre J: Radiation Scattering by Dilute Polymer Solutions in Shear Flow: An Example of Mesoscale Modeling and Brownian Dynamics Simulation, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 200.

Waheed Uddin
Viscoelastic Characterization of Polymer-Modified Asphalt Binders of Pavement Applications

Appl. Rheol. 13:4 (2003) 191-199

Rutting is a primary reason of premature deterioration of asphalt highway pavements. Pavements constructed with polymer and other modifiers are showing improved performance. The virgin asphalt and modified asphalt binders and mixes used on several test sections of the I-55 highway rehabilitation project in northern Mississippi are compared. The laboratory creep compliance data for these binders were measured at low temperatures using a modified test procedure adapted for the Bending Beam Rheometer device. Dynamic Shear Rheometer was used at high service temperatures. The creep compliance data of the binder was used as an input to simulate creep compliance behavior of the mix using a micromechanical model. The field evaluation confirms the relatively poor performance of the virgin asphalt section with respect to rutting, compared to modified binder sections.

Cite this publication as follows:
Uddin W: Viscoelastic Characterization of Polymer-Modified Asphalt Binders of Pavement Applications, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 191.

Diego B. Genovese, M.A. Rao
Apparent Viscosity and First Normal Stress of Starch Dispersions: Role of Continuous and Dispersed Phases, and Prediction with the Goddard-Miller Model

Appl. Rheol. 13:4 (2003) 183-190

Apparent viscosity, ha, and first normal stress coefficient, y1, of six different concentrations of cross-linked waxy maize (CWM), 3.5-5 % w/w, and tapioca, 2.8-4 % w/w, starch dispersions (SDs) showed power law relationships with shear rate, g·, and increased with starch concentration. In both ha and y1, volume fraction of the granules, f, played a more important role than the amylose content of the continuous phase. Slope of ha - g· curves increased mildly with starch concentration, while slope of y1 - g· curves was almost the same for CWM at all concentrations and 4 % tapioca SDs. Values of ha and y1 predicted from dynamic rheological and apparent viscosity data based on the Goddard-Miller model were in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

Cite this publication as follows:
Genovese DB, Rao MA: Apparent Viscosity and First Normal Stress of Starch Dispersions: Role of Continuous and Dispersed Phases, and Prediction with the Goddard-Miller Model, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 183.

Ketan Joshi, Lewis Wedgewood
Stagnation Flow Studies of Polymer Solutions in 2D System

Appl. Rheol. 13:4 (2003) 174-182

Stagnation flow studies form a key research area in numerous applications dealt with industry. When a fluid approaches a solid boundary, it undergoes severe deceleration along the axis of impingement. We present the experimental findings of the effects of stagnation point on polymeric flow systems. While coating metal sheets or wires with a polymer melt, the metal sheet forms a moving plane on which a steady flow of the melt is maintained. Further in the process the polymer melt cools down and forms a coating. Stagnation region exists around the point where the polymer melt first touches the metal sheet. We try to simulate this situation except in our experiments the solid plane is not moving. The polymer solution flows down the inverted T-channel and strikes the base where we obtain the stagnation region. Laser Doppler technique is used to analyze the flow profile in this region. Initial analysis includes the analysis of a Newtonian fluid which is compared to theoretical predictions. Polyisobutadiene solution with three different concentrations, 0.1%, 1% and 3%, was tested for observing the effect of the change in concentration on the flow patterns around the stagnation point. In the stagnation region the fluid is not completely stagnant but follows a non-streamwise motion.

Cite this publication as follows:
Joshi K, Wedgewood L: Stagnation Flow Studies of Polymer Solutions in 2D System, Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 174.

Walter Richtering
Polymer Physics (M. Rubinstein, R. Colby)

Appl. Rheol. 13:4 (2003) 172-173

Cite this publication as follows:
Richtering W: Polymer Physics (M. Rubinstein, R. Colby) , Appl. Rheol. 13 (2003) 172.


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