Applied Rheology: Publications

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Joao M. Maia
Numerical and analytical methods in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics

Appl. Rheol. 11:5 (2001) 287

Cite this publication as follows:
Maia JM: Numerical and analytical methods in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 287.

Claus Gabriel
2nd Workshop on inverse problems in rheology and related experimental techniques

Appl. Rheol. 11:5 (2001) 284-286

Cite this publication as follows:
Gabriel C: 2nd Workshop on inverse problems in rheology and related experimental techniques, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 284.

Jörg Läuger, Gerhard Raffer
Physica advanced Peltier system PTD150 (Pat. Pendt.). Making the temperature control with a Peltier system accurate

Appl. Rheol. 11:5 (2001) 281-283

Cite this publication as follows:
Lä, uger J, Raffer G: Physica advanced Peltier system PTD150 (Pat. Pendt.). Making the temperature control with a Peltier system accurate, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 281.

Yogesh M. Joshi
Studies on Wall-Slip in Entangled Polymeric Liquids

Appl. Rheol. 11:5 (2001) 277-280

In this work, it is attempted to theoretically understand the phenomenon of wall slip through empirical and molecular models. Initially, we use the framework a transient network theory. We show that the severe disentanglement in the interfacial region can give rise to non-monotonic flow curve locally in that region. Further, we generalize this model into a unified slip model, which predicts wall slip by either disentanglement or by debonding mechanism, depending upon the adhesive energy of the wall-polymer pair. The model predictions of the critical wall shear stress are in good agreement with experiments for various adhesive energies of the wall-polymer pair. The model predicts that the temperature dependence of the critical wall shear stress for debonding is different than that of disentanglement mechanism under certain experimental conditions. To validate the predictions of unified model, we measure the critical stress for sudden slip due to debonding for various temperatures using cone and plate viscometer with fluoroelastomer-coated cone. The temperature dependence of the critical stress for instability (slip) on a coated cone is found out to be inversely dependent on temperature, which expected for the case of debonding. In the final part of this thesis, we develop a parameter-free tube model for predicting the stick-slip phenomenon. The model, which is based on the contour variable model [Mead et al., 1998, Macromolecules, 31, 7895], considers the dynamics of the tethered chains, which are grafted on a highenergy wall and which are entangled with the bulk chains flowing past them. We show that the restricted relaxation modes of the tethered molecule give rise to discontinuous slip instability. More specifically, the slow relaxation of the tethered chain due to the restricted convective constraint release is unable to randomize its flow-induced orientation above a critical shear rate or stress. This decreases the resistance to flow for the bulk chains, which suddenly slip past the oriented tethered chains.

Cite this publication as follows:
Joshi YM: Studies on Wall-Slip in Entangled Polymeric Liquids, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 277.

G.P. Roberts, H.A. Barnes, C. Mackie
Using the Microsoft Excel `solver' tool to perform non-linear curve fitting, using a range of non-Newtonian flow curves as examples

Appl. Rheol. 11:5 (2001) 271-276

The Microsoft Excel ‘Solver’ tool is a very simple but powerful procedure, even in the hands of the mathematically disadvantaged. It has very good application for quickly fitting experimental flow-curve data to non-Newtonian flow models with any number of parameters, and can cope with data from a number of sources. Examples are given for a range of industrially important examples ranging from standard non-Newtonian liquids, through detergent solutions to gels, pastes, and filled polymer melts, often measured on different viscometers.

Cite this publication as follows:
Roberts GP, Barnes HA, Mackie C: Using the Microsoft Excel `solver' tool to perform non-linear curve fitting, using a range of non-Newtonian flow curves as examples, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 271.

Silvara Junus, Jenni L. Briggs
Vane sensor system in small strain oscillatory testing

Appl. Rheol. 11:5 (2001) 264-270

To overcome difficulties (slip, sample disturbance) associated with traditional sensors, a semi-empirical method was developed to allow the use of a 4-bladed vane sensor in small strain oscillatory testing. It was assumed that the vane sensor acted as a bob with an acting radius, RV, different from the actual radius of the vane (0.02005 m). To solve for RV, the complex modulus obtained using a concentric cylinder sensor from reference viscoelastic fluid, was set equal to the complex modulus equation for vane sensor. RV values were grouped into three phase shift ranges from 5° to less than 16°, from 16° to less than 60°, and from 60° to 90° and they were 0.01883, 0.01869, and 0.01850 m, respectively. These values were used in the calculation of viscoelastic properties of eight commercial food products, which resulted in complex modulus values within 15% of those obtained using a concentric cylinder sensor. Results showed that this particular vane and cup system can be used to directly measure the storage and loss moduli of viscoelastic material and phase shift within the upper frequency value of 6.28 rad/s. Above 6.28 rad/s, there is an inconsistency in phase shift angles measured using vane method. This method is ideal for testing thixotropic food systems because disturbance is minimal during sample loading, giving more accurate viscoelastic measurements.

Cite this publication as follows:
Junus S, Briggs JL: Vane sensor system in small strain oscillatory testing, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 264.

T. Kitano, S.A.R. Hashmi, N. Chand
Dynamic viscoelastic properties of organic/inorganic fibres reinforced LLDPE composites in molten state

Appl. Rheol. 11:5 (2001) 258-263

Dynamic rheological parameters such as storage modulus, G’, loss modulus, G’’, and dynamic viscosity, h’, at 200°C were studied for Kevlar fibres, glass fibres and their hybrids reinforced linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE). Parallel plate rheometer was employed for these tests. G’, G’’ and h’ increased with the increased reinforcement and angular frequency, w. Two sets of reinforcement, 10 and 20 vol.% of fibres are used in LLDPE. The composition of fibres in hybrid composites was varied. The replacement of glass fibres with Kevlar increases the values of G’, G’’ and h’. The values of these rheological parameters also increased with the thickness of the composite. This increase was associated with the decreased average orientation of fibres present in the composite. The effects of the change in strain amplitude on G’ and G’’ is also studied and reported here.

Cite this publication as follows:
Kitano T, Hashmi SAR, Chand N: Dynamic viscoelastic properties of organic/inorganic fibres reinforced LLDPE composites in molten state, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 258.

Peter Fischer
Mechanical Response of Polymers - An Introduction (Alan S.Wineman, K. R. Rajagopal)

Appl. Rheol. 11:5 (2001) 257

Cite this publication as follows:
Fischer P: Mechanical Response of Polymers - An Introduction (Alan S.Wineman, K. R. Rajagopal), Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 257.


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