Applied Rheology: Publications

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Yatchko Ivanov
Balkan seminar on rheology and 9th national workshop on rheology (Sofia/Bulgaria)

Appl. Rheol. 11:3 (2001) 156-157

Cite this publication as follows:
Ivanov Y: Balkan seminar on rheology and 9th national workshop on rheology (Sofia/Bulgaria), Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 156.

Malcolm Mackley
3rd Encontro da Sociedade Portuguesa de Rheologia (Mirandela/Portugal)

Appl. Rheol. 11:3 (2001) 155-155

Cite this publication as follows:
Mackley M: 3rd Encontro da Sociedade Portuguesa de Rheologia (Mirandela/Portugal), Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 155.

Gareth H. McKinley
72nd annual meeting of the society of rheology (Hilton Head Island, South Carolina/U.S.A)

Appl. Rheol. 11:3 (2001) 153-154

Cite this publication as follows:
McKinley GH: 72nd annual meeting of the society of rheology (Hilton Head Island, South Carolina/U.S.A) , Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 153.

R. Muller, M. Bouquey, F. Mauguiere, G. Schlatter, C. Serra, J. Terrisse
Rheology of reactive polymer blends: separation of mixing and reaction steps

Appl. Rheol. 11:3 (2001) 141-152

The crosslinking reaction in various types of polymer blends was followed by rheological measurements. Miscible polymers with controlled glass transition temperature, chain length and number of functional units per chain were synthesized by bulk radical copolymerization. Other experiments were carried out on immiscible systems based on commercial polymers. Blends were either prepared in a batch mixer or directly in the parallel-plate geometry of a rotational rheometer. Due to the low glass transition or melting temperature of most blend components, it was usually possible to separate the mixing step which was carried out at low temperature from the crosslinking reaction which was followed by small amplitude dynamic measurements at higher temperatures. The influence of several parameters on the reaction was studied, in particular : the reaction temperature, the amount of shear during the mixing step (or mixing time), the number of functional units per chain in each blend component and the blend composition. For the miscible blends, a master curve for the dependence of the elastic modulus G’ as a function of reaction time could be drawn for different functionalities and blend compositions.

Cite this publication as follows:
Muller R, Bouquey M, Mauguiere F, Schlatter G, Serra C, Terrisse J: Rheology of reactive polymer blends: separation of mixing and reaction steps, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 141.

Chenxu Yu, Sundaram Gunasekaran
Correlation of dynamic and steady viscosities of food materials

Appl. Rheol. 11:3 (2001) 134-140

Eight commercial foods representing a wide range of viscosities (i.e. honey, condensed milk, mayonnaise, tomato ketchup, cream cheese, yogurt, process and Mozzarella cheeses) were investigated. Their steady shear viscosity and dynamic complex viscosity were determined by rheological measurements at two temperatures using a Bohlin-CVO rheometer. Based on experimental data, shear rate dependence of steady flow apparent viscosity and frequency dependence of dynamic viscosity was established and compared. It was determined that for condensed milk, tomato ketchup and mayonnaise, a modified Cox-Merz relation could be established. For cream cheese, a generalized Cox-Merz relation was proposed; and for yogurt, a deviation from the Cox-Merz rule was found. For Mozzarella and process cheeses a sharp drop in steady shear viscosity was noticed between 1~10 s-1 shear rate range. The Cox-Merz rule was not applicable for these cheese samples.

Cite this publication as follows:
Yu C, Gunasekaran S: Correlation of dynamic and steady viscosities of food materials, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 134.

T. Neidhöfer, M. Wilhelm, H.W. Spiess
Fourier-transform-rheology on linear polystyrene melts

Appl. Rheol. 11:3 (2001) 126-133

Large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) was applied to a linear polymer melt in order to study the mechanical harmonic generation in the nonlinear regime. In the nonlinear regime mechanical harmonics at 3w1, 5w1, etc. are generated under oscillatory shear with a shear frequency w1. These higher harmonics can be analysed with respect to frequencies, amplitudes and phase if the time data of the torque is Fourier transformed. This experimental method (FT-Rheology) permits therefore to quantify the mechanical nonlinearities if sinusoidal shear rates are applied. This article describes the basic idea of this experimental method as well as the application to different anionically polymerized polystyrene melts. The dependence of the nonlinear, rheological properties with respect to the molecular weight Mn, the applied strain g0, the frequency w1 and the temperature was investigated. In addition to simple nonlinear theories we could also observe even harmonics at 2w1, 4w1, etc. in the FT-rheology spectra. The appearance of even harmonics was correlated with the appearance of a more complex nonlinear behaviour.

Cite this publication as follows:
Neidhö, fer T, Wilhelm M, Spiess HW: Fourier-transform-rheology on linear polystyrene melts, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 126.

Peter Fischer
Polymer and Composite Rheology (Rakesh K. Gupta)

Appl. Rheol. 11:3 (2001) 125

Cite this publication as follows:
Fischer P: Polymer and Composite Rheology (Rakesh K. Gupta), Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 125.


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