Applied Rheology: Publications

Appl Rheol online available publications for selected issue

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Delegates of the national rheological societies
Society's Site Mar 2001 - Aug 2001

Appl. Rheol. 11:1 (2001) 45-51

Cite this publication as follows:
Rheological Societies: Society's Site Mar 2001 - Aug 2001, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 45.

Petros G. Koutsoukos
The 14th conference of the european colloid and interface society

Appl. Rheol. 11:1 (2001) 42

Cite this publication as follows:
Koutsoukos PG: The 14th conference of the european colloid and interface society, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 42.

Jacques Bouton, Abdellatif Ait-Kadi
The 50th canadian society of chemical engineering conference

Appl. Rheol. 11:1 (2001) 40-41

Cite this publication as follows:
Bouton J, Ait-Kadi A: The 50th canadian society of chemical engineering conference, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 40.

Nadia El Kissi
35th annual general meeting of the french group of rheology (GFR)

Appl. Rheol. 11:1 (2001) 38-39

Cite this publication as follows:
Kissi NE: 35th annual general meeting of the french group of rheology (GFR), Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 38.

Alain Goubert, Jan Vermant, Paula Moldenaers, Axel Göttfert, Benoit Ernst
Comparison of measurement techniques for evaluating the pressure dependence of the viscosity

Appl. Rheol. 11:1 (2001) 26-37

The different methods that can be used for measuring the effect of a hydrostatic pressure on the viscosity of polymer melts are evaluated. A linear low-density polyethylene is chosen as test material, as it can be expected to have a small pressure dependency. Special attention is given to methods employing capillary rheometry, as these methods yield a range of shear rates and pressures that are typically encountered under polymer processing conditions. The accuracy of the different techniques is evaluated considering also the complexity of the experimental devices. First it is investigated to which extent standard capillary rheometry can be used to extract information about the pressure dependency of the viscosity. Secondly, it is shown how the accuracy can be greatly increased by the simple addition of a pressure chamber below the exit of the capillary, with a needle valve to regulate the back pressure. The results from this device are compared with those from a more robust method using a pressurized double piston rheometer and with literature data. The experimental values for the pressure coefficient of the viscosity will also be compared with those predicted from PVT data using Utracki's method.

Cite this publication as follows:
Goubert A, Vermant J, Moldenaers P, Gö, ttfert A, Ernst B: Comparison of measurement techniques for evaluating the pressure dependence of the viscosity, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 26.

D. Jaros, J. Petrag, H. Rohm, F. Ulberth
Milk fat composition affects mechanical and rheological properties of processed cheese

Appl. Rheol. 11:1 (2001) 19-25

Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out to explore the influence of the composition of the fat phase on mechanical and rheological properties of processed model cheeses. Cheeses made from caseinates, emulsifying salts and a milk fat fraction liquid at 24°C, which was achieved by thermal separation, showed much lower moduli than processed model cheeses manufactured with a fat fraction solid at 30°C. Processed model cheeses made from caseinates, emulsifying salts and a hard butter with a low amount of unsaturated fatty acids were significantly higher in firmness than cheeses made with soft butter with a higher amount of unsaturated fatty acids. In experiments using mature Gruyè and emulsifying salts, processed cheeses made from summer Gruyè were less firm than processed winter Gruyè. The results indicate that fat composition strongly affects mechanical properties of processed cheese, and a model is provided to explain structural changes during deformation.

Cite this publication as follows:
Jaros D, Petrag J, Rohm H, Ulberth F: Milk fat composition affects mechanical and rheological properties of processed cheese, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 19.

Sunil B. Adalja, Joshua U. Otaigbe
Melt rheology of tin phosphate glasses

Appl. Rheol. 11:1 (2001) 10-18

The melt rheology of a low Tg tin phosphate glass [Pglass] has been studied with oscillatory shear flow experiments to accelerate efforts to melt process the glass with different organic polymers. The w dependence of the complex viscosity h* of the Pglass is easily predicted by a modified Rouse model with two relaxation times. The complex viscosity of the glass at different temperatures and frequencies can be superposed and described by the Arrhenius equation. At higher temperatures, the melt viscosity of the Pglass increased monotonically with time. This viscosity rise is thought to be due to sample crystallization. The Pglass was melt-mixed with two different thermoplastic polymers (low-density polyethylene and polystyrene) to produce unique hybrid materials with interesting microstructures.

Cite this publication as follows:
Adalja SB, Otaigbe JU: Melt rheology of tin phosphate glasses, Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 10.

Peter Fischer
Rheology: An Historical Perspective (R.I. Tanner, K. Walters)

Appl. Rheol. 11:1 (2001) 8

Cite this publication as follows:
Fischer P: Rheology: An Historical Perspective (R.I. Tanner, K. Walters), Appl. Rheol. 11 (2001) 8.


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