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Reinhardt Kotze, Rainer Haldenwang, Paul Slatter
Rheological characterisation of highly concentrated mineral suspensions using an Ultrasonic Velocity Profiling with combined Pressure Difference method

Appl. Rheol. 18:6 (2008) 62114 (10 pages)

The rheological behaviour of non-Newtonian, highly concentrated and non-transparent fluids used in industry have so far been analysed using commercially available instruments, such as conventional rotational rheometers and tube viscometers. When dealing with the prediction of non-Newtonian flows in pipes, pipe fittings and open channels, most of the models used are empirical in nature. The fact that the fluids or slurries that are used normally are opaque, effectively narrows down the variety of applicable in-line rheometers even further, as these instruments are normally based on laser or visible light techniques, such as Laser Doppler Anemometry. In this research, an Ultrasonic Velocity Profiling technique (UVP), in combination with a pressure difference (PD) measurement, was tested to provide in-line measurement of rheological parameters. The main objective of this research was to evaluate the capabilities of the UVP-PD technique for rheological characterisation of different concentrations of non-transparent non-Newtonian slurries. Kaolin, bentonite, Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC) and water solutions were used as model non-Newtonian mining slurries. Results determined by the UVP-PD method were compared with results obtained by off-line rheometry and in-line tube viscometry. The agreement between the UVP-PD method, tube viscometry and conventional rheometry was found to be within 15 % for all of the highly concentrated mineral suspensions investigated over a given range of shear rates.This method, if used in combination with a pressure difference technique (PD), has been found to have a significant potential in the development process of new in-line rheometers for process control within the mining industry.

Cite this publication as follows:
Kotze R, Haldenwang R, Slatter P: Rheological characterisation of highly concentrated mineral suspensions using an Ultrasonic Velocity Profiling with combined Pressure Difference method, Appl. Rheol. 18 (2008) 62114.

Raj Chhabra, Paul Slatter
First Conference of the Southern African Society of Rheology (SASOR)

Appl. Rheol. 17:1 (2007) 41-41

Cite this publication as follows:
Chhabra R, Slatter P: First Conference of the Southern African Society of Rheology (SASOR), Appl. Rheol. 17 (2007) 41.

A.Ya. Malkin, I. Masalova, D. Pavlovski, P. Slatter
Is the Choice of Flow Curve Fitting Equation Crucial for the Estimation of Pumping Characteristics?

Appl. Rheol. 14:2 (2004) 89-95

The answer to this provocative question is .no.! This is demonstrated by experiment and analysis for two very different materials . a highly concentrated emulsion and an 8%v/v Kaolin clay suspension. The flow curves of both materials clearly showed a low shear Newtonian asymptote and a pseudoplastic domain. The difference in the accuracy of the fitting equations relates mainly to the low shear rate domain. While the Cross equation is adequate over the full flow curve, the power law and the Herschel-Bulkley equations are clearly inadequate for the low shear rate range. These equations as well as the direct numerical method (using the Rabinowitsch- Weissenberg integral) were used for the calculation of the laminar pipe flow transport characteristics and the results were compared with experimental pipe flow data. It was shown that in all cases the maximum error did not exceed 5%, which is quite acceptable for engineering design, indicating that the choice of the flow curve fitting equation was unimportant.

Cite this publication as follows:
Malkin AY, Masalova I, Pavlovski D, Slatter P: Is the Choice of Flow Curve Fitting Equation Crucial for the Estimation of Pumping Characteristics?, Appl. Rheol. 14 (2004) 89.


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