Applied Rheology: Publications

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Kostas Housiadas, Georgios Georgiou
A special rheology symposium in honor of Professor Roger Ian Tanner, on the occasion of his 82nd birthday

Appl. Rheol. 25:5 (2015) 62-62

Cite this publication as follows:
Housiadas K, Georgiou G: A special rheology symposium in honor of Professor Roger Ian Tanner, on the occasion of his 82nd birthday, Appl. Rheol. 25 (2015) 62.

Markus Hutter, Ger Koper
7th International Workshop and Summer School on Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics (IWNET 2015)

Appl. Rheol. 25:5 (2015) 61-61

Cite this publication as follows:
Hutter M, Koper G: 7th International Workshop and Summer School on Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics (IWNET 2015), Appl. Rheol. 25 (2015) 61.

Imane Belyamani, Joshua U. Otaigbe, Dana Nelson, Brian Strom, James Roberds
Rheological properties of southern pine oleoresins

Appl. Rheol. 25:5 (2015) 53708 (12 pages)

Despite the economic and ecologic importance of pine oleoresins, their rheology remains little explored. In this report we describe rheological properties of oleoresins produced by mature trees of four southern pines native to North America (loblolly, slash, longleaf, shortleaf). Results indicate that these oleoresins are structured fluids that exhibit viscoelastic behavior, but differ in flow behavior. Slash pine oleoresin exhibited Newtonian flow behavior while the oleoresin from the longleaf and shortleaf pines showed pseudoplastic behavior and the loblolly pine oleoresin showed Bingham fluid behavior with a yield stress of about 1.980 Pa. Temperature-dependent viscosities for the oleoresin samples studied were well described by the Arrhenius model, yielding flow activation energies ranging from 153.5 to 219.7 kJ/mol. The viscosity of the slash pine oleoresin sample was found to be less sensitive to temperature than that of the shortleaf or longleaf pine samples. The time-temperature superposition principle was successfully applied to pine oleoresins to show behavior over the temperature range of 25 - 65°C typical for a thermorheologically simple system. Such behavior is consistent with the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties found for these complex fluids, and supports the effective use of rheological evaluations for describing physical properties of pine oleoresins.

Cite this publication as follows:
Belyamani I, Otaigbe JU, Nelson D, Strom B, Roberds J: Rheological properties of southern pine oleoresins, Appl. Rheol. 25 (2015) 53708.

Willy Mbasha, Irina Masalova, Rainer Haldenwang, Alexander Malkin
The yield stress of cement pastes as obtained by different rheological approaches

Appl. Rheol. 25:5 (2015) 53517 (11 pages)

Different rheological methods for yield stress estimation of cement pastes during initial hydration were used and results were compared. These methods include measuring of the hysteresis loop, flow curves (recalculated to the same time of hydration) and large amplitude oscillating strain (LAOS). Experiments were performed with four Ordinary Portland Cements from one manufacturer, produced at different factories and one polycarboxylate acid based superplasticiser (SP). The yield stress values obtained by constructing flow curves is the only method which gives information about the evolution of the rheological properties, reflecting structure evolution of cements pastes. It was shown that the yield stress values established by the LAOS method and that calculated from the flow curves are similar while the values found from the downward part of the hysteresis loops are much lower. Differences in the yield stress values obtained by various methods are related to the different states of the material corresponding to the kinetics of hydration. The hysteresis loops provide information about thixotropic characteristics of the material including characteristic times of rebuilding and the rate of yield stress evolution of cements. The rheological properties are very sensitive to the chemical and physical differences of the cements and could be used for their characterization.

Cite this publication as follows:
Mbasha W, Masalova I, Haldenwang R, Malkin A: The yield stress of cement pastes as obtained by different rheological approaches, Appl. Rheol. 25 (2015) 53517.

Johannes Nowak, Christoph Nowak, Stefan Odenbach
Consequences of sheep blood used as diluting agent for the magnetoviscous effect in biocompatible ferrofluids

Appl. Rheol. 25:5 (2015) 53250 (8 pages)

Magnetic nanoparticles suspended in suitable carrier liquids can be adopted for use in biomedicine. For this to be achieved, the biocompatibility of these ferrofluids needs to be ascertained. In cancer treatment, potential applications currently under investigation include, e.g. drug targeting by using magnetic fields and the destruction of diseased cells by applying alternating magnetic fields, which cause heating of magnetic nanoparticles. To enable the use of ferrofluids in the actual biomedical context, detailed knowledge of the flow characteristics is essential to ensure safe treatment. From ferrofluids used in the engineering context, a rise of viscosity when a magnetic field is applied - the magnetoviscous effect - is well known. This effect, which leads to an increased viscosity and profound alteration of a fluid's rheological behaviour, has also been demonstrated for biocompatible ferrofluids used in the aforementioned applications. In biomedical applications, ferrofluids will be diluted in the blood stream. Therefore, the interaction between whole blood and the ferrofluid has to be investigated. This is the focus of the current experimental study, which makes use of two different ferrofluids diluted in sheep blood to gain a deeper understanding of the fluid mixtures primarily regarding the relative change in viscosity if an external magnetic field is applied. The results demonstrate a strong interaction between blood cells and structures formed by the magnetic nanoparticles and show a high deviation of results compared to ferrofluids diluted in water. These findings have to be taken into account for future research and applications of similar biocompatible fluids to guarantee safe and effective use in living organisms.

Cite this publication as follows:
Nowak J, Nowak C, Odenbach S: Consequences of sheep blood used as diluting agent for the magnetoviscous effect in biocompatible ferrofluids, Appl. Rheol. 25 (2015) 53250.

Flavio H. Marchesini, Monica F. Naccache, Aline Abdu, Alexandra A. Alicke, Paulo R. de Souza Mendes
Rheological characterization of yield-stress materials: Flow pattern and apparent wall slip

Appl. Rheol. 25:5 (2015) 53883 (10 pages)

An experimental and numerical investigation of the rotational rheometry of yield-stress materials is performed, using waterbased Carbopol dispersions. The flow and fluid characterization in different rheometer geometries, namely the smooth Couette, the grooved Couette, and the vane-in-cup are analyzed. The bi-dimensional flow governing equations are solved numerically, using the finite volume method and Fluent software (Ansys Inc.). The viscoplastic behavior of Carbopol dispersions is modeled using the Generalized Newtonian constitutive equation with the regularized viscoplastic viscosity function proposed by de Souza Mendes and Dutra [1], herein called SMD function. The flow pattern and the presence of apparent wall slip in rheometric measurements of yield-stress materials are investigated and discussed.

Cite this publication as follows:
Marchesini FH, Naccache MF, Abdu A, Alicke AA, deSouzaMendes PR: Rheological characterization of yield-stress materials: Flow pattern and apparent wall slip, Appl. Rheol. 25 (2015) 53883.

Michael W. Boehm, Heather M. Shewan, Jennifer A. Steen, Jason R. Stokes
Illustrating ultra-low-volume rheology on a conventional rheometer: Charting the development of hyaluronan during fermentation

Appl. Rheol. 25:5 (2015) 55609 (8 pages)

We provide methodologies to characterise the rheology of ultra-low volumes of polymer solutions and biological fluids (10 - 100 μL) on a rotational rheometer. The technique utilises a parallel plate geometry with narrow gaps of 20 - 100 micrometers, which is an order of magnitude less than conventional methods. Despite the complications these gaps present, the use of appropriate protocols ensures reliable and accurate rheological characterisation of fluids, including shear-dependent viscosity, normal stresses and linear viscoelasticity. This rheological technique.s usefulness is further demonstrated by showing how the rheology of hyaluronan solutions evolve during fermentation. The intrinsic viscosity of the hyaluronan macromolecule is determined using less than 100 μL of solution extracted directly from the bioreactor, and this is used to provide a reasonable indicator of its molecular weight as it develops during the fermentation process. The ability to measure rheology of ultra-low volumes has applications in the characterisation of biological fluids and high value macromolecules, as well as generally in biotechnology and nanotechnology research fields.

Cite this publication as follows:
Boehm MW, Shewan HM, Steen JA, Stokes JR: Illustrating ultra-low-volume rheology on a conventional rheometer: Charting the development of hyaluronan during fermentation, Appl. Rheol. 25 (2015) 55609.


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